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Uncovering Recovery: Shame on You!

“The crushing pain of shame need not keep us from the sunlight of the spirit.  Shame need not keep us fleeing from ourselves in addiction, even if that addiction is as subtle as projecting our shadows onto others (well, sometimes that’s not too subtle, actually) or constantly keeping ourselves busy so that we never dwell within our own center.  Whatever bad things we have done—even if we have urinated in the janitor’s bucket—we are not a bad thing.  Guilt is meant to be temporary, something to work through, and we need not split off parts of ourselves that we hide and bury in sick secrets.”

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Pandemic Ministry: Between the Church and the World

“The grace of the folks in the homeless camps we delivered food to reminded me again and again why I do ministry. One day I showed up with bags of sandwiches and a woman who lives in one camp greeted me with laughter. It was strange, something I hadn’t heard in a long time, and I smiled. The people of my parishes who cared so deeply about each other and the world dared me to hope. The way they talked to each other, with genuine concern, every time we met by Zoom. The way they organized to support our homeless neighbors, gathering resources and sharing their time. So I did hope, a little. And then a little more. Finally I was able to pray. And then to listen to the Word. And so I continue in this work, but with a focus on each person I encounter and the blessing they offer, and with a little more patience for myself.”

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Speaking to the Soul

Fairy Tale

“‘I don’t know why it should affect me in this way. Perhaps, it reminds me that life really is a beautiful fairy tale.'” (from The Letters of Rosa Luxemburg)

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The Lead

Spiritual coaches in West Baltimore

“We need people in the community who are not talking at us but talking with us.” said Carol Scott, an emergency room physician and one of the co-directors of the program called Kindred Coaches. “We need people who can provide facts and information and can inspire.”

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The Magazine

Uncovering Recovery: Shame on You!

“The crushing pain of shame need not keep us from the sunlight of the spirit.  Shame need not keep us fleeing from ourselves in addiction, even if that addiction is as subtle as projecting our shadows onto others (well, sometimes that’s not too subtle, actually) or constantly keeping ourselves busy so that we never dwell within our own center.  Whatever bad things we have done—even if we have urinated in the janitor’s bucket—we are not a bad thing.  Guilt is meant to be temporary, something to work through, and we need not split off parts of ourselves that we hide and bury in sick secrets.”

Read More »

Pandemic Ministry: Between the Church and the World

“The grace of the folks in the homeless camps we delivered food to reminded me again and again why I do ministry. One day I showed up with bags of sandwiches and a woman who lives in one camp greeted me with laughter. It was strange, something I hadn’t heard in a long time, and I smiled. The people of my parishes who cared so deeply about each other and the world dared me to hope. The way they talked to each other, with genuine concern, every time we met by Zoom. The way they organized to support our homeless neighbors, gathering resources and sharing their time. So I did hope, a little. And then a little more. Finally I was able to pray. And then to listen to the Word. And so I continue in this work, but with a focus on each person I encounter and the blessing they offer, and with a little more patience for myself.”

Read More »

Do We Want to be Made Well? The Sickness and Sin of Racism in America

“To be made well will require us to put aside all thoughts of the perceived impediments to wellness; we’ll have to help each other into the stirred up waters of the pool. To be made well will require us to not fear change or the collective healthy growth of our community; we will have to come to the table together, to have honest conversation about how the sickness of racism continues to impact our communities, and work together to plan for whole-community transformation.”

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