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Worship without walls

Worship without walls

Worship Without Walls offers evening worship in public spaces throughout the summer. Episcopal News Service reports:

Wearing a traditional black clerical shirt and collar, and less- traditional black shorts and sandals, the Rev. John Mennell sits near a portable altar, waiting for stragglers. About a dozen people — one with a leashed dog named Gideon at her feet — sit facing him in two rows of folding chairs. Backed by the sounds of diners chatting outside a nearby eatery and passing vehicular traffic, Mennell rises and greets worshipers at the corner of Church Street and South Fullerton in Montclair, New Jersey, to the July 28 Worship Without Walls.

From the weekends of Memorial Day through Labor Day, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Montclair is holding 5:00 p.m. Sunday Eucharists in public, outdoor spaces. Similar to “flash mobs,” participants are alerted to the location each week via text message. Passersby are encouraged to join.

….

To sign up to receive a text message with the location of upcoming Worship Without Walls services, text “stlukesmtc” to 41411

What are you doing to take worship out into the public square?

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tgflux

That’s pretty freaking awesome!

JC Fisher

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