2021_001_A

Support the Café

Search our Site

Women fall behind men in Bible engagement during pandemic

Women fall behind men in Bible engagement during pandemic

Just as the pandemic has reduced women’s engagement in the workplace, it has reduced their engagement with the Bible. Blame increased family responsibility for their children’s care and education during the workday borne more by women than men.

John Plake, writing for the American Bible Society.

In the ten years of State of the Bible surveys, women generally exhibit higher levels of Scripture engagement than men…..For the first time, June State of the Bible data revealed that women and men had approximately the same levels of Scripture engagement across the country.

Two key forces have exerted pressure predominantly on women during the COVID-19 pandemic. First, women with children
at home were often expected to adjust both to employment changes—ranging from increased demand for their work to working from home and even unemployment—while also taking increased responsibility for their children’s care and education during the workday. Second, many Bible Engaged and Bible Centered women were disconnected from their church gatherings, small group meetings, and less formal connections with friends who share and encourage their faith. The combined effect of increased demands on their time and decreased opportunities for social interactions around the Bible may have disrupted women’s Bible engagement routines and contributed to their decreased Scripture engagement as a population.

RNS reports on the study:

The number of American adults the American Bible Society considers “Scripture engaged” based on how frequently they read Scripture and its impact on their relationships and choices dropped significantly from 28% to 22.7% between January and Juneaccording to additional data collected by the organization in June.

Frequency of Scripture reading also dropped over the last year, with daily readers dropping from 14% to 9% and those who read the Bible several times a week, from 14% to 12%, the lowest number on record, according to the survey, conducted in January with Barna Group, a Christian research firm.

The pandemic also shaped what people search for on Biblegateway.com. As reported by RNS,

The website BibleGateway.com, which allows users to read and search the text of multiple translations of the Bible, saw unusual spikes in related searches around the first COVID-19 lockdowns last spring, the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the protests that followed in the summer and the U.S. presidential election this fall, according to Bible Gateway’s Year in Review.

Users searched for Bible verses related to politics, social issues, the end times and — perhaps not surprisingly — pandemics at least 10 times more this year than they did in 2019, according to the website.

Link to image above.

3 2 votes
Article Rating
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

1 Comment
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
B. D. Howes

“ many Bible Engaged and Bible Centered women were disconnected from their church gatherings, small group meetings, and less formal connections with friends who share and encourage their faith.”

Oh, of course because none of these impacted men!

When will we stop the gender bashing? The Episcopal Church has one foot in the grave while the other is on ice. Time to say, “take your angry self and get therapy.”

Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2021_002

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café