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Why Wright is wrong on same-sex marriage

Why Wright is wrong on same-sex marriage

Bishop N.T. Wright rehashed the old arguments in an interview marriage. Tobias Haller analyses the interview and his defense of traditional marriage.

In a Godward Direction:

NT Wright is a distinguished scholar in the area of New Testament studies, but when he gets off his primary topic and into the muddy waters of the marriage equality debate he does not serve either himself or his reputation well, particularly when his comments are off-the-cuff in an interview. That being said, it should be expected that any competent scholar would be able to avoid the shoals of error upon which Wright founders in this conversation.

And a strange conversation it is. Wright begins by launching into an ill-informed and curmudgeonly argument about the meaning of the word marriage. His claim is that applying marriage to a same-sex couple is a total novelty — not just in English but across all cultures — and implies that the effort to give it that meaning is similar to word-torture by Nazis and the Politburo. Marriage, he claims, has “always been male plus female…”

…So Wright can assert his counterfactual on word usage as much as he likes, but marriage not only has been used to refer to same-sex marriages for millennia, but it is now part of civil law in many countries. His response: “Simply at that level, I think it’s a nonsense. It’s like a government voting that black should be white. Sorry, you can vote that if you like, you can pass it by a total majority, but it isn’t actually going to change the reality.” Obviously he is also unaware that the English word “black” derives from the Anglo-saxon blæc — meaning “white (Think “bleach”)…..”

…In the final section of the interview Wright show all the signs of frustration at a lost cause. I can almost hear him holding his breath at the end, after a final foot-stomp. He compares the movement for equal marriage to the pressure towards war in Iraq (and why is it that all of his comparisons are violent and over the top). He seems to think that being on the wrong side of history is a statement about trends and pressures. History doesn’t force things, it records them. In this interview, Wright is wrong about history as well as being on the wrong side of it.

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Melissa Holloway

Wright also rehearses that ‘complementarity’ backflip – the image of binary sets created by God going back to Genesis and assumed throughout the New Testament. Untidily, however, it is contrary to the ancient gender ideology informing the New Testament which imaged just one sex, male, females being underdeveloped and incomplete versions of fully human Dale Martin’s book, Sex and the Single Savior, for anyone interested.

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