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Why we need diversity

Why we need diversity

An old Candid Camera video, using the Asch experiment, shows the power of “group-think” but Brain Pickings reports that having just one colleague express a different opinion made others eager to share their opinions.

Having just one peer contravene the group made subjects eager to express their true thoughts. Surowiecki concludes:

Ultimately, diversity contributes not just by adding different perspectives to the group but also by making it easier for individuals to say what they really think. […] Independence of opinion is both a crucial ingredient in collectively wise decisions and one of the hardest things to keep intact. Because diversity helps preserve that independence, it’s hard to have a collectively wise group without it.”

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Peter Pearson

Oh this is wonderful! I haven’t seen this clip since my “psychology of groups” course in college. It is something that I have tried at various times over the last thirty five years just for kicks. No matter how it turns out, it’s always funny. Now think about the standing/kneeling thing we do every week and consider the times when you or somebody you know is out of sync. Not all that different.

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