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Why most churches have fewer that 200 members

Why most churches have fewer that 200 members

Carey Nieuwhof offers eight reasons why most Protestant churches remain on the small side. The eight reasons boil down to one reason. Nieuwhof, lead pastor of Connexus Community Church in Barrie, Ontario, writes:

They organize, behave, lead and manage like a small organization.

Think about it.


There’s a world of difference between how you organize a corner store and how you organize a larger supermarket.

In a corner store, Mom and Pop run everything, Want to talk to the CEO? She’s stocking shelves. Want to see the Director of Marketing? He’s at the cash register.

Mom and Pop do everything, and they organize their business to stay small. Which is fine if you’re Mom and Pop and don’t want to grow.

But you can’t run a supermarket that way. You organize differently. You govern differently. There’s a produce manager, and people who only stock shelves. There’s a floor manager, shift manager, general manager and so much more.

So what’s the translation to church world?

Visit his site to learn the reasons, then come on back to talk about them.

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Leslie Scoopmire

Hopefully, “Mom” is stocking shelves, not stalking them, because that would be creepy.

[LOL – thanks for catching that Leslie – yes very creepy]

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