2020_010_A
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White Protestants don’t mirror general public in views on poverty

White Protestants don’t mirror general public in views on poverty

White Mainline and evangelical Protestants are less likely than Catholics, or the general public, to believe that the government should do more to battle poverty or reduce the gap between rich and poor, according to a new Pew poll:

When asked how much the government should do to reduce poverty, 47% of U.S. Catholics say “a lot” and an additional 31% say “some.” Among the general public, 53% say “a lot” and 29% say “some.” Religiously unaffiliated Americans are particularly likely to answer “a lot” (59%), while 26% say “some.” White evangelical Protestants (39%) and white mainline Protestants (41%) are somewhat less likely than the unaffiliated to say “a lot.”

The results are similar on the question of how much the government should do to reduce the gap between the rich and everyone else. The share of Catholics (42%) saying “a lot” is roughly the same as the share of the general public (43%) that takes the same position on this question, while, again, religiously unaffiliated Americans are more likely to say “a lot” (56%) and white evangelicals (30%) and white mainline Protestants (28%) are less likely to do so.

How does this correspond with your view of White Protestants in America? Read more here.

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tgflux

how much the government should do to reduce the gap between the rich and everyone else. The share of Catholics (42%) saying “a lot” is roughly the same as the share of the general public (43%) that takes the same position on this question, while, again, religiously unaffiliated Americans are more likely to say “a lot” (56%) and white evangelicals (30%) and white mainline Protestants (28%) are less likely to do so.

Yikes! What’s wrong w/ (white) Mainline Prots here? [I’m hoping that Episcopalians measure up more like the catholics we—well, I, anyway—say we are]

This follows on the heels of the story I read, “If you’re in favor of the death penalty, you’re probably white”.

What does it mean? Just pulling this out of my you-know-where, but I’d guess a toxic mix of Calvinism (“We’re the Elect!”), and suppressed guilt (which then turns into rationalization). “Praise Jesus and Fly that Stars&Bars, those welfare queens, gang-bangers, and illegal aliens are Out To Get Us!!1!1!”

JC Fisher

A Facebook User

I’d love to see what this is like, controlled for self-reported political identity. In other words, I suspect that it’s not the lack of religious affiliation making the Nones more likely to call for government intervention, it’s the fact that Nones are more likely to be progressive in the first place. But is a conservative None more or less likely to call for government intervention than a conservative white Protestant, Catholic, etc.?

Greg Johnston

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