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Where children sleep

Where children sleep

If you haven’t taken time to view the pictures from James Mollison’s new book “Where Children Sleep”, then take five or ten minutes right now. The images are startling, striking and in a few cases deeply poignant.

From the write up on New York Times gallery of images:

“His subjects came from Boy Scout troops and sumo wrestling clubs. They were introduced through friends of friends. Mr. Mollison posed his young subjects — more than 200 of them — in front of blank white backgrounds for their portraits, leaving their bedrooms to do the talking. More than 50 pairings are in the book, which has a glow-in-the-dark cover (a nod to the glow-in-the-dark stars on so many childhood ceilings).

As much as the project is about the quirkiness of childhood, it is, more strikingly, a commentary on class and on poverty. But the diversity also provides a sense of togetherness.

Everybody sleeps. And eventually, everybody grows up.”

See them here.

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tgflux

In 2011, I’m rather amazed that the FIRST reaction to an adult male doing a project called “Where Children Sleep” isn’t something like “Uh-oh” or “Yikes!”. O_o

JC Fisher

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