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What is a just distribution?

What is a just distribution?

Trinity, Wall Street is hosting a theological conversation on the question of wealth distribution. It’s worth noting because of the significant criticism that they have received because of their unwillingness to open Duarte Park to the Occupy Wall Street Protestors.


From the Trinity Wall Street news page:

“Gary Dorrien of Union Theological Seminary asks the question: “What is a just distribution of wealth and power?” as he discusses “Economic Crisis, Social Ethics, and Economic Democracy.”

Hat tip to Bishop George Packard who emailed the link to the House of Bishops and Deputies discussion list with a note of appreciation to the congregation for hosting the talk.

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Lance Woodruff

The Trinity audience was small. Via Internet, and the recorded, repeated word, the issue gets a focused, continuing and expanding audience. Starting with one venue, OWS expanded to 900 cities on four continents. Trinity Church derives its economic support from Wall Street, yet Jim Cooper and Trinity Institute continue to question: "What is a just distribution of wealth and power?" in the context of the social gospel as central and not peripheral to following Jesus. Gary Dorrien faults Trinity for backing down at Duarte Park. Water carrying bishop George Packard keeps the story before the wider church. Thanks to Episcopal Café for bringing the story to us in Bangkok.

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Lance Woodruff

The Trinity audience was small. Via Internet, and the recorded, repeated word, the issue gets a focused, continuing and expanding audience. Starting with one venue, OWS expanded to 900 cities on four continents. Trinity Church derives its economic support from Wall Street, yet Jim Cooper and Trinity Institute continue to question: "What is a just distribution of wealth and power?" in the context of the social gospel as central and not peripheral to following Jesus. Gary Dorrien faults Trinity for backing down at Duarte Park. Water carrying bishop George Packard keeps the story before the wider church. Thanks to Episcopal Café for bringing the story to us in Bangkok.

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Rod Gillis

Compelling analysis. The section on Credit Unions and the Mondragon (Spain) examples are right on.

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Josh Magda

Big crowd (...)

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