What is #myepiscopalidentity?

by

In light of the ongoing debates within the Anglican Communion, we’ve been wondering how Episcopalians understand their identity as Episcopalians.  So, we thought we’d just ask.  You can submit a regular submission for publication or write a post on your own blog or tumblr or add a photo to Instagram or maybe even make a new Pinterest board or whatever.  Just use the hashtag #myepiscopalidentity and send us a Facebook message, Tweet or email (newsteam@episcopalcafe.com) to give us a heads up.  We’ll share as many as we can and we look forward to hearing from you!

Dislike (0)
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail
Facebooktwitterrss
Yvonne Finne
Guest
Yvonne Finne

I was raised Southern Baptist and lived for quite a while in a Baptist Children's Home. I became Episcopalian in 1985 with the birth of our son. Since then I have grown into a vocal supporter of the New Testament covenant, a Cursillista, a mentor through EfM, and a member of whatever singing group is available to me. I consider myself a person with fiercely examined faith that has become very stark, in that I believe in a minimalist approach to church decor, prayers, teachings and worship. I do recognize that statement leaves one wondering. For example, I find myself "put off" by large floral arrangements; I wish the money had spent on education or outreach, even if it's in the budget. For me that is a distracting and an unnecessary adornment. I'm lucky to have found a wonderful parish where no seems to mind.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Joan Gundersen
Guest
Joan Gundersen

I am a 7th generation Episcopalian who researches the history of the Church, especially the roles of women. None of my family are or have been clergy, but we helped found at least 2 parishes. I cherish the breadth of a church whose members included both early feminists and anti-feminists, abolitionists and slave owners, industrialists and socialists, a church that blends Protestant and catholic traditions, fights over worship traditions BECAUSE worship is what holds us together, not a long set of doctrines, gives people room to think, and searches for the middle way.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Lloyd Spiegel
Guest
Lloyd Spiegel

I was baptized Roman Catholic to my Roman Catholic mom and Lutheran father. My dad, God bless him, had a disagreement with the Priest in our parish over tithing and there was this beautiful, old Episcopal church right in town. I was confirmed Episcopal. Over the years I have disagreed with TEC on a variety of things and have left the church on a couple of occasions. But I have always consider it my church, where I belong. I have come to believe the most important things we are called to do are not who is marrying who, or if my Priest is a gay woman or is trans-gendered. We have a much higher purpose with or without the Anglican Communion, with or without the support of GAFCON, the Global South or the ACNA. I have actually become an Eucharistic Minister in my Parish. I am where I belong, where I feel God has called me to be.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Nancy Platt
Guest

I am a five generation Episcopalian and two members of my family were clergy as I am. I value the middle road through catholic orthodox and Protestantism that I find in the 1979 prayer book although I was brought up on the more penitential 1928 BCP/ I cherish the combination of liturgy sacraments etc. in my worship. I also value the TEC polity, have been active in GC and count clergy and bishops among family friends. My grandchildren make it 7 generations.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Brandon
Guest
Brandon

Grew up in the Baptist Church, I was baptized as an Episcopalian at the young age of 30. Gay but actually libertarian in my politics. The Episcopal Church for me is a place where difference in opinions is literally welcomed. Get a room full of Episcopalians together and we are not all going to agree on everything. However, our disagreements don't make us any less Episcopalian or Christian and I love to acknowledge this.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
wpDiscuz