What is #myepiscopalidentity?

by

In light of the ongoing debates within the Anglican Communion, we’ve been wondering how Episcopalians understand their identity as Episcopalians.  So, we thought we’d just ask.  You can submit a regular submission for publication or write a post on your own blog or tumblr or add a photo to Instagram or maybe even make a new Pinterest board or whatever.  Just use the hashtag #myepiscopalidentity and send us a Facebook message, Tweet or email (newsteam@episcopalcafe.com) to give us a heads up.  We’ll share as many as we can and we look forward to hearing from you!

Dislike (0)
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail
Facebooktwitterrss
JoS. S. Laughon
Guest

Baptized EC, worship in the ACNA, middle of road between Anglo-Catholic & evangelical/Puritan

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Ken Saunders
Guest

Identity -
1. The way we worship: Book of Common Prayer, Ancient rites & rituals, sacraments, the use of music/hymnody, art, etc... all that draw us in and closer to God.
2. The way we are governed: Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Laypeople. Keeping the scriptural orders of ministry and teaching handed down by the apostles.
3. The way we engage theology: scripture, tradition, and reason.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
JoS. S. Laughon
Guest

Amen

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Christopher Stephen Jenks, BSG
Guest
Christopher Stephen Jenks, BSG

I was raised in the Episcopal Church in the 1960s. My dad was a priest and served as vicar of St. Peter's Chelsea in NYC, just up the street from the General Seminary. I attended St. Luke's School in Greenwich Village, which was operated by St. Luke's Chapel of Trinity Parish (now the Church of St. Luke-in-the-Fields) where I sang on Sundays in the boys' choir. I remained actively involved in the church through college, and in 1987 I was admitted to the Brotherhood of St. Gregory. For the past 20+ years I have lived and worked with men who are mentally ill and dealing with substance abuse as the primary way I live out my apostolate.

I guess I could best categorize myself as "Progressive Anglo-Catholic." I am quite traditional when it comes to the most basic doctrines of Christianity (I recite the Nicene Creed without crossing my fingers). I much prefer traditionally structured liturgies and I'm suspicious with liturgical innovation that too often comes across as gimmicky. However I am very progressive when it comes to social issues, such as same-sex marriage, and I hold political views that could best be described as Christian Socialist. I believe these views are in accord with gospel values.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Finley Morton
Guest
Finley Morton

At age 14, I became unhappy with the teachings of the church that I was in. I checked out five books from the library and studied for six months. I was confirmed in St. Mark's in Beaumont Texas by Bishop John Hines. I joined the choir and now, 62 years later sing at St. Martin's in Houston.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Nancy C Lea
Guest
Nancy C Lea

I am still a strong Episcopalian but feel very let-down by my parish "family" in the way I was forgotten after a series of injuries left me with no choice but to stay near home most of the time...my name has been on the prayer list for 5 years now, yet nobody calls or comes by. It's very disheartening..very different from my NEW YORK parish when I had gotten mugged and could hardly stop the parade of visitors and helpers! I still love my church and look forward to getting back into more regular attendance, but, the hurt, and sense of not "belonging" is hard to deal with.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Leslie Marshall
Guest
Leslie Marshall

I'm praying for you Nancy, my heart goes out to you.

"LORD, may those who fear you rejoice when they see me, for I have put my hope in your Word...May your unfailing love be my comfort according to your promise to your servant. Let your compassion come to me, that I may live, for your law is my delight....preserve my life according to your love." from Psalm 119.

love, leslie.

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
wpDiscuz