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Welby’s observations about the Episcopal Church

Welby’s observations about the Episcopal Church

When Archbishop-designate Justin Welby visited the House of Bishops, he spoke about what he observed about the Episcopal Church.

In this reflection I want to start with what I have seen. The structure of the meeting, with its well integrated retreat and business sessions, was excellent, and the mediations in the mornings were exceptional and personally nourishing. I found integrity and openness on issues, graciousness under pressure, and towards others who have not been gracious, catholicity, complexity and inclusion. I have found some myths demythologised.

For example the myth that TEC is only liberal, monochrome in its theological stand, and the myth that all minorities of view are oppressed. There is rather the sense of a complex body of wide views and many nationalities addressing issues with what I have personally found inspiring honesty and courage, doubtless also with faults and sins, but always looking to see where the sins are happening. The processes are deeply moving even where I disagreed, which I did on a number of obvious issues, but the honesty of approach was convincing, the buy into and practice of Ndaba superb. In summary, there has been a sense of calm confidence and expectation, and of facing the vast challenge of the next 10-15 years. You have a better pension plan too.

Read the rest here.

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