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Welby asks the Pope to maintain unity

Welby asks the Pope to maintain unity

In the wake of the General Synod’s vote to allow the appointment of women to the episcopate in the Church of England, the Archbishop of Canterbury has written to the Pope to ask that this not impede the vital work of Christian unity between the two communions.


The impact of ordaining women to the episcopate has long raised questions about the impact on ecumenical relationships. At several points in the history of the debate, our ecumenical partners have even weighed in with their perspective. Therefore, ++Welby’s letter is heartening.

In his letter sent to the Pope and other churches, Archbishop Welby wrote: “We are aware that our other ecumenical partners may find this a further difficulty on the journey towards full communion. “There is, however, much that unites us, and I pray that the bonds of friendship will continue to be strengthened and that our understanding of each other’s traditions will grow.”

He added: “It is clear to me that whilst our theological dialogue will face new challenges, there is nonetheless so much troubling our world today that our common witness to the Gospel is of more importance than ever.

“There is conflict in many regions of our world, acute poverty, unemployment and an influx of oppressed people driven away from their own countries and seeking refuge elsewhere.

“We need each other, as we, as churches empowered by the Holy Spirit, rise to the challenge and proclaim the good news of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and strive for closer fellowship and greater unity.”

Read the whole article here.

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Geoffrey McLarney

Indeed, I've often heard it observed that Rome will recognize women priests before Orthodoxy, because it has a Pope.

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Apps 55753818692 1675970731 F785b701a6d1b8c33f0408

Re Clint Davis: I'm not sure I share your pessimism with regards to Rome. After all, nobody expected Vatican II to EVER happen. True, I don't expect them to ordain women within my lifetime. "Never," however, is a long time.

-Cullin R. Schooley

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Apps 55753818692 1675970731 F785b701a6d1b8c33f0408

Re Clint Davis: I'm not sure I share your pessimism with regards to Rome. After all, nobody EVER expected Vatican II to occur. Don't get me wrong, I don't expect any major changes to occur within my lifetime. But "never" is a long time.

-Cullin R. Schooley

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Clint Davis

Rome wasn't writing anyone any letters after Vatican I asking to keep moving forward. The decisions of that council will make reunion between Rome and anyone else completely impossible without total submission to the direct and ordinary jurisdiction of the rarely but twice already infallible Bishop of Rome, as a MATTER OF FAITH. No way. Not us, not Orthodoxy, not anyone. So cooperation yes, but full visible unity ain't gonna happen. Rome will never convene another Council that would set Vatican I aside. Vatican II didn't, Vatican III/IV/V/CXXXVII won't either.

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Ann Fontaine

Bishop Pierre Whalon -writes some of that history back in at Huffington Post.

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