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Water bill owed by Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Water bill owed by Church of the Holy Sepulchre

(AP) A clergyman from the church built on the site where Jesus Christ is said to have been crucified said Friday that its bank account has been frozen as the result of a long-standing dispute with an Israeli water company.


The church for decades was exempt by the different leaderships which ruled over Jerusalem’s Old City from paying water bills until the Israeli water company began pressing it to pay up a few years ago.

Fakitsas, the superior of the Greek Orthodox church, said an agreement was reached after months of negotiations. Under the deal, various denominations in the church would pay their monthly bill. A debt of some 9 million shekels was to be forgotten, he said.

But to the surprise of the church elders, its account was blocked two weeks ago, making it impossible to pay stipends of some 500 priests and monks, 2,000 teachers and the running costs of over 30 Christian schools that the church runs in the Palestinian territories and Jordan, church spokesman Issa Musleh said.

The water company, which could not immediately be reached for comment, demands the church pay for its water charges from which it has been exempt for decades.

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billydinpvd

Maybe the Israelis are trying to move them out so they can build a settlement on the site...

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