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Victoria’s Secret coming for middle-schoolers

Victoria’s Secret coming for middle-schoolers

Amy Gerwing writing at The Black Sphere blog reveals the latest outrage from Victoria’s Secret who featured Justin Beiber, tween idol, in a recent show:

…Our country is replete with an unprecedented number of young girls suffering from eating disorders and body mutilation, while pushing the limits of sexual promiscuity. Is this racy underwear modeled by unrealistically thin girls really the best that we have to offer our girls? In this age when female sex trafficking is becoming a wide-spread crisis, reaching into the depths of our inner cities, is it really responsible for Victoria’s Secret to entice our impressionable young girls with this “come hither” message?

Within minutes, Beiber was on stage performing alongside scantily-dressed Victoria Secret Angels, while millions of young girls – 80 % of whom struggle with body image – eagerly watched at home. The not-so-subliminal marketing message was sent: I like Justin Beiber, Justin Beiber likes Victoria’s Secret, and therefore I should buy Victoria’s Secret.

….

The new brand called, “Bright Young Things,” includes lace black cheeksters with the word “Wild” emblazoned on it, green and white polka-dot hipsters screen printed with “Feeling Lucky?” and a lace trim thong with the words, “Call me” on the front.

A father, the Rev. Evan Dolive responds:

…as I read an article today posted on The Black Sphere, it really got me thinking that maybe the culture that we currently find ourselves in is not helping the cause.

Recently I read an article that Victoria’s Secret is launching a line of underwear and bras aimed at middle school aged children. …

As a dad, this makes me sick.

I believe that this sends the wrong message to not only my daughter but to all young girls. I don’t want my daughter to ever think that her self-worth and acceptance by others is based on the choice of her undergarments. I don’t want my daughter to ever think that to be popular or even attractive she has to have emblazon words on her bottom. I want my daughter (and every girl) to be faced with tough decisions in her formative years of adolescence. Decisions like should I be a doctor or a lawyer? Should I take calculus as a junior or a senior? Do I want to go to Texas A&M or University of Texas or some Ivy League School? Should I raise awareness for slave trafficking or lack of water in developing nations? There are many, many more questions that all young women should be asking themselves… not will a boy (or girl) like me if I wear a “call me” thong?

I want my daughter to know that she is perfect the way she is; I want my daughter to know that no matter what underwear she is wearing it does not define her.

Read both articles – what do you say? Victoria’s Secret says “They want to be older, and they want to be cool like the girl in college, and that’s part of the magic.” or danger for our children?

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Lucia Lloyd

So now grownups are promoting kids having sex while they're in middle school so that businessmen can make more money on underwear sales.

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tgflux

This, set against the debate within the Boy Scouts over the dangers of gays. Argh.

JC Fisher

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