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Victim of Taliban violence wows Jon Stewart and the world

Victim of Taliban violence wows Jon Stewart and the world

Nobel Peace Prize nominee Malala Yousafzai, 16, inspires the world, and Jon Stewart, with her wisdom about non-violence in the face of oppression. Business Insider notes:

In the key moment of the interview, Stewart asked her how she reacted when she learned that the Taliban wanted her dead. Her answer was absolutely remarkable:

I started thinking about that, and I used to think that the Talib would come, and he would just kill me. But then I said, ‘If he comes, what would you do Malala?’ then I would reply to myself, ‘Malala, just take a shoe and hit him.’ But then I said, ‘If you hit a Talib with your shoe, then there would be no difference between you and the Talib. You must not treat others with cruelty and that much harshly, you must fight others but through peace and through dialogue and through education.’ Then I said I will tell him how important education is and that ‘I even want education for your children as well.’ And I will tell him, ‘That’s what I want to tell you, now do what you want.’

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tgflux

IF the world were ever to move towards a unified government (and I know that sets off “black helicopter” folks, but I think, in light of GLOBAL concerns, it’s needed), Planet Earth could do a LOT worse than having this young woman as its President!

JC Fisher

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