Ugandan Archbishop walks out of Primates meeting

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from the website of the Anglican Church of Uganda:

Archbishop Stanley Ntagali’s Update on the Primates Gathering in Canterbury

13th January 2016

Dear Bishops, Clergy, and Lay Leaders in the Church of Uganda,

Praise the Lord! Thank you so much for your prayers for me as I traveled to Canterbury, England, for the gathering of Primates called by the Archbishop of Canterbury to address the events that caused the fabric of the Anglican Communion to be torn at its deepest level. We traveled well, and I’m writing to give you a brief update.

On the second day of the gathering, I moved a resolution that asked the Episcopal Church USA and the Anglican Church of Canada to voluntarily withdraw from the meeting and other Anglican Communion activities until they repented of their decisions that have torn the fabric of the Anglican Communion at its deepest level. They would not agree to this request nor did it appear that the Archbishop of Canterbury and his facilitators would ensure that this matter be substantively addressed in a timely manner.

Sadly, after two long days of discussions, I was concerned that the process set up for this meeting would not permit us to address the unfinished business from the 2007 Primates Meeting in Dar es Salaam.

In accordance with the resolution of our Provincial Assembly, it was, therefore, necessary for me to withdraw from the meeting, which I did at the end of the second day. It seemed that I was being manipulated into participating in a long meeting with the Episcopal Church USA and the Anglican Church of Canada without the necessary discipline being upheld.  My conscience is at peace.

I have left the meeting in Canterbury, but I want to make it clear that we are not leaving the Anglican Communion. Together with our fellow GAFCON Provinces and others in the Global South, we are the Anglican Communion; the future is bright. The door is open for all those who seek communion on the basis of a common confession of our historic, Biblical faith for which the Ugandan Martyrs, Archbishop James Hannington, Archbishop Janani Luwum and many others around the world have died. We are part of a global movement of Anglicans who follow the God who “so loved the world that He gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16)

I will share more with you in due course, but I wanted you to know directly from me what is happening in Canterbury. I have never been more happy and proud to be part of the Church of Uganda.

Yours, in Christ,

The Most Rev. Stanley Ntagali

ARCHBISHOP OF CHURCH OF UGANDA.

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Anne Bay
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Anne Bay

As a lifelong Episcopalian and thankful to be such, I think the time has come to divide up the Anglican Communion. The American church is trying to keep up with modern scientific and cultural findings, whereas there are several branches of the Anglican world communion who have their own agenda, like Uganda. The bottom line is countries like Uganda have a multiplicity of issues to deal with-ie. former colonies of England and trying to establish their own autonomy at the expense of being open to modern findings in biology, science, physiology, and cultural norms. I would bid them farewell and be content that they wouldn't be intimidating the poor Archbishop of Canterbury and the English church with their diatribe of condemnations and going home because they don't get their way. I'm proud of the American church's move forward-as Anglicans we are encouraged to use our brains to think through modern knowledge, not to dig our feet into the sand and stand still. I hope the American church has the "balls" so to speak to stick up for themselves. People's lives are at stake, especially the LGBT community, women's rights to have the determining factor in their health, legislation to protect each person's life, no matter what their gender/beliefs/ethnic makeup/etc. When the Prime Minister of Canda, Trudeau, was asked why he appointed people who are of the LGBTcommunity to his cabinet, he simply responded, "It's 2015"!! So, it's now 2016, and it's time to take a stand for modernity in the church as well as politically. Quoting from "Peanuts"- Good grief Charlie Brown!

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Rick Knuth
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Rick Knuth

Uganda has an annual per capita income of just $1613, the life expectancy is 58.5 years (almost 20 years shorter than in the U.S.), and one in three Ugandans under the age of 5 is mal-nourished. And this issue is where the primate of Uganda chooses to direct energies, his resources, and his prophetic voice. Wow.

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John Chilton
Editor
John Chilton

Impotency to solve real problems breeds diversion to phony problems.

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Jeremy Bates
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Jeremy Bates

Yes. And fear of the Other. And a need to establish one's own righteousness.

If you think disease is a moral judgment by God, then you cure AIDS by passing Primates' resolutions.

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Therese Trujillo
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Therese Trujillo

I think that we need to be better and more loving than they are. I think we need to keep reaching out and showing that our love is stronger than the hate of people's "differences."
The LGBT community has turned the other cheek over and over and shown that Love is always better. Stopping the funding of projects that help people is not the way. Let us help them get over their fears. Let us help them get over their hate. Let us reach out and keep reaching out until they recognize that our hands are filled with love.

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Jay Croft
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Jay Croft

Why is this man smiling?

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