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Uganda anti-gay bill again

Uganda anti-gay bill again

Box Turtle Bulletin notes that the so called anti-homosexuality bill will be a regression for civil rights even if the anti-gay provisions are removed:

Uganda’s proposed Anti-Homosexuality Bill has been re-introduced into Parliament and is currently in the hands of the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee. As the Committee considers what to do with the bill, there has been considerable confusion over what would happen if the bill were to become law. Most of the attention has focused on the bill’s death penalty provision, but even if it were removed, the bill’s other seventeen clauses would still represent a barbaric regression for Uganda’s human rights record. In this series, we will examine the original text of bill’s eighteen clauses to uncover exactly what it includes in its present form.

Box Turtle examines the clause by clause provisions and what they mean:

Clauses 1 and 2: Anybody Can Be Gay

Clause 3: Anyone Can Be “Liable To Suffer Death”

Clause 4: Anyone Can Try To Be Gay

Clauses 5 and 6: Anyone Can Be A Victim (And Get Out Of Jail Free If You Act Fast)

Clauses 7 and 14: Anyone Can “Aid And Abet”

Clauses 8 to 10: A Handy Menu For “Victims” To Choose From

Clauses 11, 14, 16 and 17: Nowhere To Run, Nowhere To Hide

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James Pirrung-Mikolajczyk

This is a dark hour in Uganda for the religious on both sides of the gay question...

James Pirrung

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