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Tutu on the lingering aspects of Apartheid

Tutu on the lingering aspects of Apartheid

Archbishop Desmond Tutu continues his work as a voice of prophecy and speaking truth as he reflects on the lingering effects of Apartheid:


Archbishop Tutu: lingering effects of apartheid include “self-hate”

Anglican Communion Communications Office

By Munyaradzi Makoni

Retired Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu has said apartheid had left South Africans suffering from “self-hate” which is partly to blame for the country’s vicious crime rate and road carnage.

“Apartheid damaged us all; not a single one of us has escaped,” said Tutu on 11 August during a book launch at Stellenbosch University’s Institute for Advanced Study near Cape Town.

The Nobel Peace Prize Laureate said the nation was no longer surprised by statistics of violent crime, murder, rape as “when you suffer from self hate you project it to others who look like you.”

As for the nation’s high auto accident rates, he said, “we drive recklessly,

inconsiderately, aggressively … because deep down we are angry and so the appalling carnage on our roads during the holidays … [these] horrendous statistics we just accept.”

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