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To the Church: An Anglican call to action, not words

To the Church: An Anglican call to action, not words

In a conference in Norway this week, moderator Dr. Agnes Abuom told the World Council of Churches that conferences are not a solution in “a world beset by injustice, inequality and rising xenophobia,” says the Anglican Communion News Service.

“The witness of many in the forefront of struggles demand that we move away from the culture of conferences and statements and begin to get engaged in actions that nurture hope and alternatives,” she said.

“There is room in the gospel for disagreement but there is no room for disengagement,” Dr Abuom added. “Pilgrimage is about hope breaking into our present, motivating us to move forward, overcoming hurdles. . . We need to move from the nostalgia of the past, set aside our burdensome preoccupations and instruments that have outlived their purpose and venture into new and relevant areas of engagement.”

The conference theme is Pilgrimage, and topics include the Middle East, children’s rights and religion and violence. One hundred fifty are attending.

Dr Abuom said the church had great responsibility and needed to be actively engaged in renouncing values and attitudes that glorified power. She said it had to denounce systems and cultures that diminished and denied life. The Church needed to be holding to account international financial institutions, military powers, industry and political systems – rather than opting to be their endorsing agents.

She said pilgrimage offered the Church immense possibilities to reimagine itself as a movement of God’s people in mission – open and agile and receptive to the promptings of the Spirit.

Photo from the WCC, via Anglican Journal.

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