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Tim Vivian honored by The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church

Tim Vivian honored by The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church

tim vivian

From the press release:

The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church is pleased to announce its recipient of the 2015 Nelson R. Burr Prize, the Rev. Dr. Tim Vivian. Dr. Vivian teaches in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies of California State University, Bakersfield. He is honored for his article “Wake the Devil from His Dream: Thomas Dudley, Quincy Ewing, Religion, and the ‘Race Problem’ in the Jim Crow South” published in the December 2014 issue of Anglican and Episcopal History. The selection committee noted the article makes excellent use of primary and secondary sources to create two portraits in a landscape of racial division that we, sadly, still recognize today.

The Burr prize honors the renowned scholar Nelson R. Burr, whose two-volume A Critical Bibliography of Religion in America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1961) and other works constitute landmarks in the field of religious historiography. Each year a committee of the Society selects the author of the most outstanding article in the Society’s journal, Anglican and Episcopal History, as recipient. The award also honors that which best exemplifies excellence and innovative scholarship in the field of Anglican and Episcopal history.

Read more here. An excerpt is available here.

Photo: the Revd Dr Tim Vivian, via http://www.stpaulsepiscopalbakersfield.org

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