The Oscars: what did you think?

by

The Atlantic

The best moment of Seth MacFarlane’s Oscars hosting gig may have come late in the night when, in announcing Meryl Streep, he said “our next presenter needs no introduction” … and then just walked away.

If only he’d kept his mouth shut more frequently.

….

But then William Shatner was beamed in for a Family Guy-esque experiment in the meta. Captain Kirk had come from the future to reveal that the headlines the next day would proclaim MacFarlane the worst Oscar host ever, unless he changed his routine. Cut to a clip—from the future, see—of MacFarlane performing “We Saw Your Boobs,” during which he essentially read off a Mr. Skin database of shirtless-actress appearances over time. The bit could have been a hilarious acknowledgement of MacFarlane’s past idiocies—if it had been, like, five seconds long. But no: We got a full minute-plus of breast chronicling, followed by MacFarlane’s definition-of-homophobic insistence to Shatner that he wasn’t a member of the gay men’s chorus he’d just sang with.

From there, the jokes just got more and more… well, what’s the word? Calling them offensive gives them too much power, which isn’t to say that black people shouldn’t have felt uncomfortable about MacFarlane pretending to mix up Denzel Washington and Eddie Murphy, or that half the population needn’t have squirmed when MacFarlane called Zero Dark Thirty’s plotline an example of “a woman’s innate ability to never let anything go.” What the jokes were, really, was stupid, boring, and empty: humor that relied less on its own patently sexist, racist, homophobic, etc. content than on admiration for or disgust with the host’s willingness to deliver it. So much of comedy is about the shock of recognition, of seeing some previously unacknowledged truth suddenly acknowledged, but the only recognition MacFarlane offered was that some people say dumb things about other peoples’ gender/racial/sexual identities. Which, of course, should not be shocking at all.

….

It shouldn’t be hard to come up with a sensible position on this. Everything, including punchlines about the Jews cutting non-Jews out of Hollywood, snickers about women faking the flu to lose weight, and cracks that there’s no need to try to understand what Salma Hayek’s saying because she’s so hot, is “OK.” It’s a free country, etc. But that doesn’t mean those jokes aren’t hurtful, obvious, or dumb. It doesn’t mean they don’t make the world a worse place. Humor, after all, can be an incredible weapon for social progress, but it can also be regressive: The more we pass off old stereotypes, rooted in hate, as normal—as MacFarlane did again and again last night—the longer those stereotypes, and their ability to harm people, will be in place. If only Captain Kirk had told us whether we’ll have moved past this nonsense by the 23rd century.

Did you watch? What did you think? Should the church speak up?

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Ann Fontaine
Guest
Ann Fontaine

Commentary on young girl star and how she was treated. here

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Toepferblue
Guest

My take: "McFarlane revealed the racism and sexism that exists throughout the system that pats itself on the back and calls itself liberal and enlightened.

"McFarlane is just the front man for a much larger system. A system that convinces women to undress in the name of art and then sings a puerile little song saying, "We saw your boobs!" A system that claims Quentin Tarantino is starting an important conversation about slavery and then jokes about how Daniel Day-Lewis would try to free Don Cheadle from slavery."

More ranting: Why, yes, Hollywood, we DID see your boobs

Laura Toepfer

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Rod Gillis
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Rod Gillis

Read this article about Denzel Washington and the Oscars last week in Bloomberg

"In different ways, the three stars all represent similar audience yearnings -- above all, the desire for moral significance. Even when they take on ambiguous or immoral roles, these stars always inhabit a universe where right and wrong have weight and consequence."

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-21/why-you-want-to-escape-with-denzel-washington.html

Kept an eye on the Oscars last night while reading posts on Episcopal Cafe.

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Christopher Johnson
Guest

Didn't see it, stopped caring a long time ago. But Seth MacFarlane? Really? Have none of those people ever seen Family Guy?

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Ronald Caldwell
Guest
Ronald Caldwell

MacFarlane gets my vote as the worst host ever. I admit to watching only the first part of the show because the "jokes" were incredibly offensive. What took the cake for me, and the "Off" button was the outside-the-bounds remark about John Wilkes Booth being the only one ever to get into Lincoln's head. Even the audience could not believe what they just heard.

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