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The future of Tibet

The future of Tibet

Lobsang Sangay, the Prime Minister of the Tibetan Government in Exile writes about the willingness of the Tibetans to enter into serious negotiations with China about the sovereignty of Tibet:


The Myth of Socialist Paradise

In The New York Times, By Lobsang Sangay, Prime Minister of Tibetan Government in Exile

THREE years ago, Tibetans from Lhasa to Lithang rose up against Chinese rule in Tibet. Earlier this week, a Tibetan monk set himself on fire — the second self-immolation this year, and a testament to China’s continuing repression and Tibetans’ continued resistance. We do not encourage protests, but it is our sacred duty to support our voiceless and courageous compatriots.

In 1950, when the Chinese Army first came to Tibet, they promised a socialist paradise for Tibetans. After more than 60 years of misrule, Tibet is no socialist paradise. There is not socialism but colonialism; there is no paradise, only tragedy.

As long as Tibetans are reduced to second-class citizens in their own homeland, there will be resistance to Chinese rule. Finding a lasting solution to the Tibet question, on the other hand, would improve China’s image in the eyes of the world and help protect its territorial integrity and sovereignty.

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