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The Christian case for gay marriage

The Christian case for gay marriage

“I am a Christian, and I am in favor of gay marriage,” writes law professor Mark Osler on CNN’s Belief Blog. “The reason I am for gay marriage is because of my faith.”

Osler, who worships at St. Stephens Episcopal Church in Edina, Minn., goes on to say:


“What I see in the Bible’s accounts of Jesus and his followers is an insistence that we don’t have the moral authority to deny others the blessing of holy institutions like baptism, communion, and marriage. God, through the Holy Spirit, infuses those moments with life, and it is not ours to either give or deny to others.”

Read Osler’s entire post here.

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Bill Dilworth

Dave, I think you got it exactly right. Using the biblical references to marriage that way advances the false notion that marriage based on mutual consent and equality, contracted by two individuals, is "traditional marriage."

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Dave Paisley

Arguing for or against marriage, gay or otherwise, based on what the bible says about it is pointless. In biblical times marriage was a business transaction between the families involved.

The bible is moot on marriage as we know it today.

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LS Innovation Editor

The ideas in this article were first included in a Sermon given last Sunday at one of my favorite Episcopal churches-- Holy Comforter in Richmond, Virginia.

LS Innovation Editor - please sign you name next time you comment. Thanks ~ed.

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