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The British are coming

The British are coming

A favorite C of E blogger of ours is coming to these shores. Author, musician and theologian, Maggi Dawn reports

It’s just been announced across the water that I am to be the Dean of Marquand Chapel and Associate Professor of Theology at Yale Divinity School. …


Marquand Chapel at YDS is ecumenical, and as Dean of Chapel I’ll be overseeing the whole programme of worship, and also the development of the students’ skills in leading worship in their various traditions. The Associate Prof. element of the job is also very exciting, and will give me lots of space to develop the work I’ve done in recent years on theology and the arts.

Read it all here.

The Cafe has cited her blog a number of times, perhaps most vividly her reflection on mitregate — the prohibition Lambeth Palace placed on our Presiding Bishop wearing her mitre at Southwark Cathedral..

The British are coming. Maggi joins Ian Markham, dean at Virginia Theological Seminary, and Jane Shaw, dean of Grace Cathedral (and former Dean of Divinity and Fellow of New College, Oxford). That, of course, is not a complete list.

On this side of the pond all would be considered Episcopalians, and thus ineligible to serve on Anglican Communion ecumenical bodies. Pity.

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tgflux

On this side of the pond all would be considered Episcopalians, and thus ineligible to serve on Anglican Communion ecumenical bodies. Pity.

{snort}

JC Fisher

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