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The Bible re-tweeted.

The Bible re-tweeted.

Blogger Jana Riess tweeted every book of the Old and New Testaments. The Mormon author of “Flunking Sainthood” spent four years summarizing each book in 140 characters or less. These tweets have been complied into a book called “The Twible” (rhymes with Bible).


RNS:

Her tweets mix theology with pop-culture inside jokes on sources as varied as ”Pride and Prejudice,” “The Lord of the Rings” and digital acronyms such as LYAS (love you as a sister). To save on precious character count, God is simply “G.”

Thus, the Ten Commandments passage in Exodus 20:1-17 becomes: “G’s Top Ten List: No gods, idols, or blasphemy. Keep the Sabbath holy & love Mom. Don’t kill, cheat, steal, lie, or look @ Xmas catalogs.” That last one covers coveting.

The book of Ruth is summed up: “Foreign girl wins Israeli edition of The Bachelor, thanks to savvy stage mom-in-law. Oh, and BTW? Women rock.”

The woman of virtue in Proverbs 31 has strength among her precious qualities, so Riess gives her “Michelle Obama arms.”

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