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The Bible is no bludgeon – Rev. Peter D’Angio

The Bible is no bludgeon – Rev. Peter D’Angio

Rich Howells profiles The Rev. Peter D’Angio, the openly gay rector of St. Luke’s in Scranton, Pennsylvania, on everything from gay marriage to what the Bible says about homosexuality.

“There are pages in the Bible, both in the Old Testament and in the writing of Paul in his letters in the New Testament, that speak about people giving themselves over to unnatural desires. For those thousands of years of history that the Bible encompasses, there was not a category of human being who was called a gay or lesbian person. It didn’t exist in the mindset,” D’Angio pointed out. “The Bible can be used as a bludgeon on a whole bunch of different issues, not just the sexuality issue. I don’t think the Bible is meant to be used as bludgeon; it’s meant to be used as an invitation to be in a relationship with God, who we find, as Christians, in Jesus Christ.”

D’Angio has been with his partner, Greg, for 20 years. While they are not yet married, family, friends, and members of the community already treat them as if they were.

“There was no point in (getting married) just to do it. I’m blessed with a relationship of 20 years that’s survived a lot, and I don’t feel the need to do it now. If marriage were to become available in Pennsylvania, speaking for me, although I think Greg would agree, I would absolutely get married,” he said.

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tgflux

That’s excellent news, Fr Craig. Thank you.

JC Fisher

Frcraig

I am rector of a suburban Scranton Church and Peter is a good friend. I’ve heard nothing negative about him being at St. Luke’s. The new RC bishop joined our bishop at a choral evensong recently (it was glorious!) at St. Luke’s which is less then a block away from the RC cathedral and bishop’s office. I am sure he knows that Peter is gay.

Craig Sweeney

tgflux

He finds that many are drawn to the Episcopal faith because of its openness and its familiarity to the largely Roman Catholic population

…and to be a fly-on-the-wall when Fr D’Angio (w/ that name! And he’s a cradle Episcopalian?) is among his RC priest colleagues! I really wonder if Fr D’Angio’s presence has shaken up ecumenical relationships there in Scranton? [Having been involved in PA ecumenism in the ’90s, they were pretty active then. Don’t know about now]

A really well-written profile—I just wish there would be a Part Two (etc!)

JC Fisher

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