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The angry priest or the boorish photographer?

The angry priest or the boorish photographer?

by Andrew Gerns

Nearly everyone has experienced the insensitive photographer. Especially if you’ve ever presided at a wedding or a baptism.

My favorite moment came when I was doing a baptism and as the infant-candidate, the parents and sponsors gathered with me around the font, and after I invited all the children in the room to come forward and join us there, I looked up to see nearly every single adult friend and family member holding up a camera, video camera or phone.

My first thought was “I wish I had a picture of this…!”

Here was an image of how we have come to mediate our experience of the world: through a screen. We see only what we record.

But there have been times when things were more annoying. When a photographer

searches for the perfect shot but is completely unconscious of his or her context, they end up just getting in the way.

I once did a wedding where, just as the wedding party was gathered around the couple, a guy with a video camera was prowling around the group like a tiger getting reaction shots of not only the bride and groom but each member of the wedding party. I could see faces of each member of the wedding party as they reacted to the lens. The act of recording the moment had become the moment.

I was lucky. The mother of the bride, using nothing more than “The Look,” firmly directed the guy to “Sit! Stay!”

So when a video went viral showing an Episcopal priest telling a videographer, who had been shooting over his shoulder, to leave, I was sympathetic. First of all, it is clear from the video that the wedding was not in a church but at a park or catering facility, so he was doing a sacred rite at a secular location. This can be awkward because the priest tends to be seen as nothing more than ‘hired help.’

When he said that the ceremony was not about the pictures but “about God,” I knew what he was saying: that this is a sacred moment, and the videographers were stealing from that by their intrusion. So part of me cheered a bit because the videographer earned the admonition.

On the other hand, the only image we have is of “The Angry Priest,” and the meme is the ruined wedding. That has become “The Story.”

The on-line comments appear to split 50-50. I have seen blog posts taking both sides. Interestingly, while there are lot of people mad at the priest for tossing out the cameraman and ruining the couple’s wedding, no one appears to be mad at the cameraman for posting the altercation on YouTube and defining forever how the wedding is remembered.

Mark Twain once said “Never pick a fight with people who buy ink by the barrel.” These days, when electrons are cheap and when everyone can be both a producer and publisher of content, it will not do to make a frontal assault against a culture that mediates experience through the screen. All it does is makes us look angry.

Although this never occurs to us when we are tripping over an over-zealous shutterbug, the truth is that we can’t be angry at the photographer one day and then the next bemoan that our message is not getting out. We can’t have it both ways.

Christians are in the story-telling business. And our story is Good News! We want to use these tools to communicate. As a parish priest, I love having pics and videos of worship because, well done, they tell people what we do and who we are. That means we can’t snarl at photographers while expecting to use their product.

So I try to negotiate and educate. Sometimes it even works.

During the process of wedding and baptismal preparation, I direct the couple or family to tell their guests to limit their photography so that everyone can give their full attention to the moment. They should tell their friends that there will be one or two official photographers and that there will be pictures of the liturgy available later from them via e-mail, Facebook, Pinterest or some other form.

For weddings, I also have the couple give me the names of the photographers and I call them and invite them to the rehearsal as well as the wedding. This helps the photographer understand the blocking and timing, it also helps me clarify expectations and solve any unique problems. And it gives the photographer a wealth of candids.

Additionally, I have developed a list of photographers that we recommend, just as we do florists. They know our space and how we work and will make life easier for the couple.

And lastly, I ask both official and unofficial photographers to send me the pictures and grant the church the right to use them for our own communications.

All of this still doesn’t prevent an intrusive photographer from happening. Just two weeks ago I did a wedding where the bride’s son, all 6’4″ of him, was trying to catch the action on a pocket video camera. It was a small church and his large frame was going to block everyone’s view. Of course, everyone was looking at him and not what was happening. Also, the official photographer–who was doing as I asked– did not appreciate that she was being limited while this unpaid visitor was doing as he pleased. I did not stop the liturgy, but I did walk over to him (and, yes, still in full view of the group) at the first “break” in the action and quietly asked him to step aside and park himself in a spot where he could still take the pictures of his mother and not distract people from witnessing and blessing her marriage.

In a world where we more and more mediate experience through screens, one of the things we can do as a church is remind people that the best photographs, films and videos describe, highlight and interpret a much bigger world. The idea is to both communicate and take us back to a moment in time that is bigger than our perceptions and means more to us than we even realized in the moment. In other words, what photography does is very much like what liturgy does.

Both can connect us, aid in interpreting our experience, and help us makes memory.

Both liturgy and media help us know, tell and live our story.

But bad photography (and unconscious photographers) can like bad liturgy (and unconscious celebrants) get in the way. This is what happened in the video when it went viral: the conversation became about “The Angry Priest vs. The Boorish Photographers” when we should have been celebrating the couple’s marriage.

Photographic technology is so accessible that we forget all the work that goes into a good production. Similarly, a good liturgy should look easy because all the practice has paid off. One of the pastoral challenges of our day is to bring the two together in ways that allow us to see more deeply into the world God has placed us in and contribute to the ongoing story of God’s unfolding, creative love.

The Rev. Canon Andrew Gerns is rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Easton, Pennsylvania, President of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Bethlehem, and a member of the newsteam of the Episcopal Café.


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Kristen Frome

Just so you know, the groom posted it online, not the photographer.

Carole May

I have to say that as a photographer, the sounds I’m hearing in the video are that of a still photographer. It sounds like he has the camera on continuous shoot mode and is shooting at about 5 frames per second. That sound can be annoying no matter where you are and certainly is NOT warranted at a wedding. For a professional photographer, that setting is used for photographing a moving subject, such as wildlife. I use it when photographing orcas. There is no way it should be used for a wedding. I don’t blame the priest for being angry. I would have been too.

Ann Fontaine

Adam – when you get old and celebrate your 50th anniversary – you may find the photos more meaningful. Our grandkids love to see the photos and none of our kids were there – so there is value. There are some good points in Andrew’s essay and in some of the comments but it will be more and more something we might want to think about in this world of cell phones where they are cameras, computers etc. and everywhere.

Paul Woodrum

Once, when officiating at a wedding, I had the ominous feeling something distracting was happening behind me. I turned and found a photographer trying to climb up on to the free-standing altar to get an overview of the couple exchanging vows and rings. With visions of the altar guild finding footprints on the fair linen, I asked him to get down and leave the church. Turned out it wasn’t a professional but the bride’s brother for whose behavior the bride apologized profusely.

Adam Spencer

Does anyone even legitimately look at their wedding photos ever again in a way in which magazine-quality pics is even a little bit important? Aren’t good memories and sacred and/or human interactions more important than flawless, staged, fake “moments”? I know I couldn’t care less about the photos. I’ll never forget how my wife looked coming down that aisle or what it looked like to see my grandmother’s smile or my buddies seated around that table of groomsmen laughing and giving me a hard time. I don’t need perfect pictures in a book or an online album; I have ’em forever in my heart. Boot the photographers and focus on what really matters; creating lasting memories that really mean something.

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