Support the Café
Search our site

The Second Commandment and the Second Amendment in North Carolina

The Second Commandment and the Second Amendment in North Carolina

The North Carolina Council of Churches, of which all three NC Episcopal dioceses are members, has sponsored a month-long message on a billboard outside Burlington, quoting the 2nd Commandment in the context of ongoing national debate over the 2nd Amendment.

WBTV reports:

 The billboard, which was put up Monday, reads “You shall not make for yourself an idol,” quoting the 2nd Commandment from the Bible. The message sits beside a photo of different types of guns on a bed of bullets. …

The council says the billboard is expected to stay up for the next four weeks and is the first in a series of messages planned over the coming months. They plan to erect a new billboard in a different part of the state throughout the summer “reminding people there is a different way of framing the conversation,” officials told WBTV.

“Nearly 70% of the people who carry a gun claim they do so for safety, while the statistics clearly show guns make us less safe. This makes guns a false idol,” council officials said. “To this end, the Council is trying to reframe some of the contentious issues in the public discourse by reminding people of faith of the guiding principles found in our scriptures and our creeds.” …

Officials say no one in the gun violence prevention collaborative wants to repeal the 2nd Amendment and many gun rights advocates support laws that include reasonable restrictions.

WBTV also interviewed a gun store owner:

As the owner of Hyatt Guns in Charlotte, Larry Hyatt is very familiar and fond of firearms, but he says he doesn’t idolize them.  

“If you’re going to walk down the valley of the shadow of death, I’m going to want my 9mm with me,” says Larry Hyatt owner of Hyatt Guns.

Read more and watch the story at WBTV. Photo via WBTV courtesy of North Carolina Council of Churches.

0 0 vote
Article Rating
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

3 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Kenneth Knapp

I hate to keep commenting on stuff, and I don’t have a strong opinion about the 2nd Amendment or Gun Control, but it seems to me that an obsession with Gun Control is just as idolatrous as an obsession with the 2nd Amendment to the Constitution. We would be a more Christian church if we put more focus on confessing our own sins and less on judging and condemning others who disagree with us.

Fred Loving

OK, so my fire estinguisher and smoke detector are also idols because I rely on them for safety ?

Brother Tom Hudson

So… “In God We Trust” but we carry guns just in case? I like the reminder about the 2nd commandment (as long as it’s not carved on a big rock in front of the courthouse), but let’s face it – this country only uses religion as a weapon, and only heeds commandments when convenient.

Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2020_012
2020_013_B
2020_013_A

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café