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The Int’l Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue issues Communiqué

The Int’l Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue issues Communiqué

After meeting in Buffalo NY 19 – 25 SEP, the International Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue has issued a Communique summing up their progress.

International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue

September 2015 Communiqué

Buffalo, New York, United States of America

In the name of the Triune God, and with the blessing and guidance of our Churches, the International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Theological Dialogue (ICAOTD) met in Buffalo, New York, from 19 to 25 September 2015. The Commission is deeply grateful for the generous hospitality extended by the Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Buffalo (Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople).

Metropolitan Nicholas of Detroit formally welcomed the Commission to its meeting in his diocese. He offered praise and encouragement for the work of the dialogue. He stressed the urgent need for expressions of Christian unity in light of the deep challenges and crises before the global community, mindful of events unfolding even as the Commission undertook its deliberations.

The Commission brought to completion the first section of its work on the theological understanding of the human person, with the adoption of its agreed statement, In the Image and Likeness of God: A Hope-Filled Anthropology. The report, shortly to be published, is the culmination of six years of study on what Anglicans and Orthodox can say together about the meaning of human personhood in the divine image.

This agreement lays the foundation for continuing dialogue on ethical decision-making in the light of this vision. At its future meetings the Commission will consider the practical consequences of this theological approach to personhood. The Commission anticipates ongoing study in areas such as bioethics and the sanctity of life, as well as human rights and ecological justice.

The meeting commenced with the Hierarchical Divine Liturgy at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church. Commission members also attended an ecumenical celebration of Evensong at St Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral. The Commission was welcomed by Bishop William Franklin of the Diocese of Western New York. In his homily he spoke of the contribution to Christian unity made by a former bishop of the diocese, Charles Henry Brent, who was a leading pioneer in the Faith and Order movement. Daily prayer strengthened and grounded the work accomplished together. Morning and evening prayers were offered, alternating between Anglicans and Orthodox.

The fellowship of the Commission was enriched by the warm and gracious reception by parishioners of the Annunciation Church, and their parish priest, the Revd Dr Christos Christakis, who is the Orthodox Co-Secretary of the dialogue. Members of the Commission were introduced to the unique historic, cultural and natural characteristics of the city of Buffalo, Niagara Falls and the surrounding area.

The work of the Commission will continue at its next meeting in September 2016, to be hosted by the Anglican Communion.

The image is from anglicannews.org
See who was at the meeting here.

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Paul Powers

Metropolitan Kalistos, the Orthodox co-chairman, is an English convert to Orthodoxy. He is well known for a book he wrote under his pre-ordination name Timothy Ware called The Orthodox Church, which I believe gives a good introduction of Orthodoxy to Western readers.

Cynthia Katsarelis

Could there be a clarification about the participation, or lack thereof, of TEC in this dialogue? The article clearly says that events took place in the Episcopal Cathedral in Buffalo and all were welcomed by the bishop of Western NY, yet Alan and Marshall are talking as if TEC was not involved.

What’s up?

Michael Hartney

The is no Diocese of Buffalo in The Episcopal Church. That is the Roman Catholic Diocese’s name. It is the Diocese of Western New York of which William Franklin is the Bishop.

Alan Herendich

It’s disappointing to see that TEC is not a part of this dialogue.

Marshall Scott

Alan, this is intended to reflect all Anglicans, and there are only so many positions to be appointed. That said, this does also reflect our difficulties of the past 15 years. On the other hand, there are participants from the Anglican Church of Canada and from the Scottish Episcopal Church, and their positions on the issues are much more similar to ours. I think we can trust them to reflect the concerns we have as Episcopalians.

Cynthia Katsarelis

Alan, we were there!!! It was hosted, in part, by the Diocese of Western NY!!! See this part:

“The meeting commenced with the Hierarchical Divine Liturgy at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church. Commission members also attended an ecumenical celebration of Evensong at St Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral. The Commission was welcomed by Bishop William Franklin of the Diocese of Western New York.”

Cynthia Katsarelis

This is truly awesome! Thank you so much, Episcopal Cafe and notably David Allen, for providing this article, and the one about dialogue with the US and Canadian Lutherans and Anglicans. It is truly inspiring to hear about us getting along and working together on common ground with fellow travelers. It is a LOVELY antidote to GAFCON.

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