Support the Café
Search our site

The future of world religions: growth projections

The future of world religions: growth projections

Pew Forum notes:

The religious profile of the world is rapidly changing, driven primarily by differences in fertility rates and the size of youth populations among the world’s major religions, as well as by people switching faiths. Over the next four decades, Christians will remain the largest religious group, but Islam will grow faster than any other major religion. If current trends continue, by 2050 …

  • The number of Muslims will nearly equal the number of Christians around the world.
  • Atheists, agnostics and other people who do not affiliate with any religion – though increasing in countries such as the United States and France – will make up a declining share of the world’s total population.

PF_15.04.02_ProjectionsOverview_projectedChange640px

 

Complete report is here 


 

posted by Ann Fontaine

 

Image: “LuMaxArt Golden Family With World Religions” by lumaxart – GEOZ06541_www.lumaxart. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons 

Dislike (0)
0 0 vote
Article Rating
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

1 Comment
Newest
Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
JC Fisher

I would be curious to know if the projections above assume that a person is of the same religion (inc Unaffiliated, Atheists, and Agnostics) in 2050 that they were in 2010? [Ditto for all the persons entering/leaving the projection totals] What do we know about religious switching in the past 40 years? Increasing, decreasing, same?

Like (0)
Dislike (0)
Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2020_001

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café