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TEC Climate Change Crisis discussion March 24 kicks off 30 Days of Action

TEC Climate Change Crisis discussion March 24 kicks off 30 Days of Action

Announced today in a release from The Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs:

[March 18, 2015] The Climate Change Crisis, presented by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society on March 24, will address one of the most significant topics in today’s society.

The 90-minute live webcast will originate from Campbell Hall Episcopal School, North Hollywood, CA, in partnership with Bishop J. Jon Bruno and the Diocese of Los Angeles.

The discussion begins at 11 am Pacific and the webcast will be available at episcopalchurch.org.

Forum questions can be submitted in advance (see below for link to release). Information on speakers and panelists:

• The forum will be moderated by well-known climatologist Fritz Coleman of KNBC 4 television news.

• Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori will present the keynote address.

• Two panels, each 30 minutes, will focus on specific areas of the climate change crisis: Regional Impacts of Climate Change; and Reclaiming Climate Change as a Moral Issue.

• Panelists: Bishop Marc Andrus, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of California He has made climate change a focus of his episcopacy; Princess Daazhraii Johnson, former Executive Director of the Gwich’in Steering Committee, one of the oldest Indigenous non-profit groups in Alaska focused on protection of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge;  Dr. Lucy Jones, seismologist with the US Geological Survey and a Visiting Research Associate at the Seismological Laboratory of Caltech since 1983; Mary D.  Nichols, J.D., Chairman of the California Air Resources Board.

March 24’s event will launch 30 Days of Action, until April 22, Earth Day, and “is one of the aspects of commemorating The Episcopal Church’s 150th year of parish ministry in Southern California.”

The full release, including a facilitator’s guide and links to additional resources, can be found here.

Posted by Cara Ellen Modisett

 

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