Support the Café
Search our site

Taiwan HoB meeting: to go or not to go?

Taiwan HoB meeting: to go or not to go?

The Rt. Rev. Dan Martins, bishop in the diocese of Springfield, has posted on his blog his intent to skip the upcoming House of Bishops meeting in Taiwan.

He explains his decision, citing several factors: the undue expense, the regrettable impression it would send, and, what he describes as “a polemical narrative about the character of the Episcopal Church.”


Thus, he writes:

My feelings about missing the meeting are not unalloyed. While I do not relish trans-Pacific air travel in economy class (having once done Chicago to Tokyo to Bangkok and back all in a middle seat), I’m sure it would be interesting to see the land, the people, and the church in Taiwan. I will very much miss the interaction with my colleagues, especially my Class of 2011 friends. And I’m facing in the direction of paranoia that, just because I’m not there, something crucial to my interests, or the interests of my diocese, will come up, and my voice will not be heard. There are no doubt those who will judge me pejoratively for not being there, or for the reasons here articulated why I am not there. So there are risks in my decision, and my eyes are open about those risks. Perhaps I err. But, as they say nowadays, it is what it is. I do hope those who attend have a good meeting. I will be holding them in my prayers.

0 0 vote
Article Rating
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Café Comments?

Our comment policy requires that you use your real first and last names and provide an email address (your email will not be published). Comments that use non-PG rated language, include personal attacks, that are not provable as fact or that we deem in any way to be counter to our mission of fostering respectful dialogue will not be posted.

9 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Leonardo Ricardo

Much admired Malcolm+ In Latin America we have several different Anglican provinces as you know. Yes, Mexico is now on its own yet Honduras, Ecuador, Columbia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic Haiti (huge) and American Virgin Islands remain within a Province of TEC. Guatemala, Costa Rica, Pamama, Nicaragua and El Salvador are IARCA. Cuba, of course IS EXPROVINCIAL under the friendly encouragement of CANADA, TEC and Uruguay. We have such a variety of¨options¨ available South of the border(s), including the Prickly Province of the West Indies (our neighbor Belize belongs right next to us in Guatemala) and the sparcely attended Southern Cone has VAST distances that sepeerate their few dioceses…the Southern Cone can’t seem to keep abreast of REAL life around them as most of their dioceses are headed away from each of their very home Nations progressiveness…even Argentina has ¨same sex marriage¨ and the Pope Francis has encouraged Catholics to make love not WAR! The Southern Cone remains a GAFCON specimen of Anglican Western Hemisphere strays.

Leonardo Ricardo

Much admired Malcolm+ In Latin America we have several different Anglican provinces as you know. Yes, Mexico is now on its own yet Honduras, Ecuador, Columbia, Venezuela, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic Haiti (huge) and American Virgin Islands remain within a Province of TEC. Guatemala, Costa Rica, Pamama, Nicaragua and El Salvador are IARCA. Cuba, of course IS EXPROVINCIAL under the friendly encouragement of CANADA, TEC and Uruguay. We have such a variety of¨options¨ available South of the border(s), including the Prickly Province of the West Indies (our neighbor Belize belongs right next to us in Guatemala) and the sparcely attended Southern Cone has VAST distances that sepeerate their few dioceses…the Southern Cone can’t seem to keep abreast of REAL life around them as most of their dioceses are headed away from each of their very home Nations progressiveness…even Argentina has ¨same sex marriage¨ and the Pope Francis has encouraged Catholics to make love not WAR! The Southern Cone remains a GAFCON specimen of Anglican Western Hemisphere strays.

GrandmèreMimi

Are the flags about boasting? It seems to me that the flag display might be simple acknowledgement of the presence of the people from the various countries.

Whether the churches should spin off on their own sooner rather than later is an entirely different matter.

June Butler

Malcolm French+

I don’t necessarily agree with Bishop Martins’ decision, but he does make a very good point:

“That we have foreign dioceses in our own hemisphere is testimony to the missionary zeal of our forebears, but the final stage of a responsible missionary strategy is always to spin off such churches as they mature into self-sustainability. We have already done so with Mexico and Brazil, for example. Rather than exploiting our Latin American dioceses for purposes of TEC branding, we should be focusing on helping them reach the point where they can form a new autonomous (but interdependent, of course) Anglican province. The number of flags on the dais should not be a point of boasting, but a source a mild embarrassment that we haven’t done a better job in bringing the missionary cycle to an organic conclusion.”

How long does it make sense for foreign missions to remain incorporated within the missionary church? The Anglican Church of Canada is no longer part of the Church of England. Indeed, the Church of England has fewer extraprovincial dioceses than the Episcopal Church.

Michael Russell

The Taiwanese Bishop has apparently attended every HoB meeting for the past 15 years. Apparently +Dan’s time and comfort are more significant than his. Things in the Simpsonville undoubtedly keep him hopping.

Equally apparent is that no one has taught him how to get an aisle seat on a plane, or suggest he spring for extra leg room.

Facebooktwitterrss
Support the Café
Past Posts
2020_012
2020_013_B
2020_013_A

The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

All Content  © 2017 Episcopal Café