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Tag: Stewardship

Finding your (fundraising) voice

“How can we persuade people to give more?” Not surprisingly, this is one of the most frequent questions I encounter in my work as a congregational consultant. Whether I’m consulting mainly on strategic planning, governance change, or growth plans (I rarely come in as a fundraiser any more), clients always want to raise more money.

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Stewardship requires clarity

What do you think about financial stewardship? While there are a host of resources for churches on developing giving, it’s important to clarify your own thinking. The clearer you are yourself, the easier it will be for you to offer others a challenge to give.

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Counting the tithe

An important question to consider as many churches begin to enter stewardship season: Does the tithe count if some of the 10% does not go to the church?

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1/3 of U.S. giving goes to religious groups

More than a third of donations go to religious groups, while education accounts for 14 percent, giving to foundations makes up 11 percent, human services receives 9 percent, health picks up 8 percent and public society groups 8 percent.

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Religious denominations face a looming financial crisis

Most congregations know the financial squeeze of recent years from the economic recession. What is more striking is that the financial downturn for denominations is even more pronounced and perhaps more long lasting. The practice of depending on fewer people to provide more money is unsustainable in the face of the coming “death tsunami.”

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