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Tag: Race

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry critiques silence of religious moderates

“I’m concerned when I don’t hear religious leaders advocating for children to be number one on the social agenda of this country. I’m concerned when I hear silence from religious leaders after the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazis marched through the streets of Charlottesville. I’m not hearing Jesus of Nazareth when I hear that silence.”

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Church in Seattle commemorates 75th anniversary of imprisonment of Japanese Americans

Yesterday, February 19th, marked the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 by Franklin D. Roosevelt, which led to the internment of hundreds of thousands of Japanese Americans during WWII. St Peter’s Episcopal Church in Seattle is an historically Japanese American congregation, and has been holding a series of events to commemorate the anniversary.

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Falls Church dedicates plaque to slaves who built it

Falls Church, the Episcopal church in the northern Virginia town of the same name, is an historic congregation, dating back to before the Revolutionary War. The building of Falls Church was erected in 1769, and although there are no definitive records of slaves doing the work, there is sufficient evidence to draw that conclusion. On February 11, the church dedicated a plaque to those laborers.

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Tim Vivian honored by The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church

He is honored for his article “Wake the Devil from His Dream: Thomas Dudley, Quincy Ewing, Religion, and the ‘Race Problem’ in the Jim Crow South” published in the December 2014 issue of Anglican and Episcopal History. The selection committee noted the article makes excellent use of primary and secondary sources to create two portraits in a landscape of racial division that we, sadly, still recognize today.

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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