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Tag: Music

The Episcopal Church offers two digital Christmas Eve programs

From the Episcopal Church:

[December 17, 2019] The Episcopal Church is offering two, digital Christmas Eve programs on December 24. Available on both the Episcopal Church website and the Episcopal Church Facebook page, these programs makes Christmas Eve worship accessible to those not attending a service or program at a local church.

 Both services will be available beginning on Christmas eve: St. Thomas’ at 4:00 pm and St. John the Baptist’s at 12:00 pm as well as at 6:00 pm (all times […]

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The Music of Advent

The sound of the choir of men and boys, the words of the scriptures leading up to the birth of Jesus, all the sounds echoing off the vaulted arches of a historic place – it’s the most wonderful thing I can think of.

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London church drops classical music and John Rutter has words

Sir Henry Wood, the founder of the Proms, London’s legendary classical music festival, is buried there, but the church has decided to oust the classical musicians who rehearse and perform in its space after having gone evangelical. In The Telegraph:

Now part of a network founded by evangelical church Holy Trinity Brompton, St. Sepulchre Without Newgate Church, in Holborn, central London, will stop taking bookings from the classical musicians which have relied on it as a rehearsal and concert venue for […]

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Whitechapel Bell Foundry to close

Whitechapel Bell Foundry in London, England, one of the most famous foundries in the world, and the oldest in Britain, is set to close in May of 2017, when the current master bellfounder, Alan Hughes, retires. Negotiations are underway for a sale of the business, but it will not remain at the current site. The foundry was established in 1570, although it has existed under various names and in various locations. It has been at its current location in Whitechapel for […]

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Speaking to the Soul: Music

The three composers we celebrate today — Byrd, Merbecke, and Tallis — were all English composers who lived around the same period of time and who helped Anglican church music grow from plainchant and simple tunes more complex melodies and harmonies of psalms, anthems, and service music.

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An earthly choir: Listening to the (Mormon) voices singing around us

The Reverend Danielle Tumminio, Episcopal priest and chaplain at the Groton School in Massachusetts, spent an afternoon in the midst of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, after being invited to be a “singing guest” with them after she expressed interested in writing about the ensemble:

My original intention was to describe what it was like to perform with such an elite group. (It was incredible, by the way.) But as I reflected on my experiences, I realized that the real story was […]

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The Magazine: Practicing

There is a right way to practice music that I find very difficult. It involves getting right into the middle of the tricky parts and working through them again and again and again. There are neurological reasons that make this the most effective way to study a piece and to improve in good time. But I find it so hard to do.

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Nuns top Billboard classical chart for second year

From WQXR:

Billboard reported this week that, for the second year in a row, the top-selling classical artists were the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles, a community of nuns from rural Missouri.

The sisters’ “Lent at Ephesus” and “Angels and Saints at Ephesus” – collections of ancient chants and hymns – were the first- and second-best selling traditional classical albums of 2014 (the traditional classical category excludes crossover releases, according to Billboard).

“Lent at Ephesus,” which was released on Feb. 11 by […]

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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