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Tag: LGBT inclusion

Dallas to debate marriage equality, again

The Bishop complains that they still have to talk about marriage equality while a resolution on eliminating the diocese’s own marriage canon defining marriage as only between a man and a woman is on the agenda.

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Reaction to outing of Bishop of Grantham of CoE

Perhaps one of the most salient is the response of Scottish priest and blogger Kelvin Holdsworth, Provost of St Mary’s Cathedral in Glasgow. In his response, he brings up some important points that have little to do with the Bishop of Grantham and a great deal to do with the seemingly endless inability of some Anglicans to accept the innate, ontological nature of human sexuality.

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Canadian Anglicans faced with yet another issue of inclusion.

UPDATE – Tonight, 11 JUL 2016, the resolution to bring marriage equality to the ACoC failed in the House of Clergy by 1 vote. It passed by the needed 2/3s majority in the Houses of Bishops & Laity. A motion to reconsider the vote on the resolution was defeated.

During his sermon for the opening eucharist for the Anglican Church of Canada’s 2016 triennial synod, the most Revd Fred Hiltz, reminded those gathered that the Canadian Church had passed through questions of inclusion a number of times since it’s first synod held in 1893.

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Walking in love on the Robert’s Mission

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information aiding in determining the cause of a fire in March at the Shoshone Episcopal Mission in Wyoming. Also known as the Robert’s Mission, it was established in the late 1800s as a Christian school by Reverend John Roberts, a Welsh missionary, with funds raised by Episcopal Bishop Ethelbert Talbot. The mission was assigned historical status in 1973 by the U.S. National Register […]

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The Archbishop replies

It is never wrong, of course, to admit false steps that can be identified and repudiated, but it would be wrong to invoke the language of repentance insincerely, without clarity on what is to be repented of.

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Listening to all voices on human sexuality in the Church of Ireland

“Select Committee met with all who requested an interview, as part of a process of listening to those with experience of living with same-sex attraction, either personally or closely connected with those who would be so identified. This was a creative and deeply moving process or engagement that left no one unaffected, even those who did not take part in the actual interviews, but, as members of the Select Committee, had access to the type-scripts afterwards. Witness from parents with children searching for their true sexual identity was particularly powerful, indeed, almost overwhelming.”

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In flesh and enfleshed

THE MAGAZINE

by Maria Evans

“Now such remarks have I wished to advance in defense of the flesh, from a general view of the condition of our human nature. Let us now consider its special relation to Christianity, and see how vast a privilege before God has been conferred on this poor and worthless substance. It would suffice to say, indeed, that there is not a soul that can at all procure salvation, except it believe while it is in the flesh, so true is it that the flesh is the very condition on which salvation hinges. And […]

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The silent twenty-three percent

Though originally appearing in Voices of Integrity in 1999, this article by Louie Clay captures an issue that has remained relevant even amidst the vast changes in the culture and in the movement towards greater equality and inclusion for LGBT persons. In coming across it, we felt it was worth looking at once again.

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

The opinions expressed at the Café are those of individual contributors, and, unless otherwise noted, should not be interpreted as official statements of a parish, diocese or other organization. The art and articles that appear here remain the property of their creators.

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