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Tag: Church growth

Why people don’t go to church

What, if anything, helps Americans grow in their faith? When Barna Group asked, people offered a variety of answers—prayer, family or friends, reading the Bible, having children—but church did not even crack the top-10 list.

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Studies in vibrancy

The Diocese of Virginia looks at five churches that have experienced growth in the past five to seven years and asked “How have these communities not only survived but even thrived during a time when many are struggling?”

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Who needs a church wedding?

As the church continues to struggle the growth of the Spiritual-but-Nonreligious, Christian Century looks at how this impacts weddings.

Traditionally, weddings have, til lately, been held under religious auspices. But more and more, young couples find themselves only seeking out a church because of family pressures, or ambiance, or some other, ephemeral

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Religion in US changing

…the fastest-growing category seems to be that of the “spiritual but not religious”–people who have a sense of connection with a higher power and want to share it with others, without signing up to formal rules or beliefs. Generally, religion seems to do best at the extremes: either rigorously conservative or free and easy.

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GTS embarks on the ‘way of wisdom.’

Believing that the ways of academic specilization and business-style management is leaving the church bereft, the Dean and faculty of General Seminary are embarking on an experiment to integrate theological education with the daily, lived experience of the church. They are calling this exploration “The Way of Wisdom.”

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An example of local re-invention

We hear a lot about how our congregations are not museums, but congregations can learn from some small local history museums near Boston have reinvented themselves, creating sustainable institutions that are going against two decades of decline for museums nationwide.

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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