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Tag: child sexual abuse

In light of priest scandals, all faith communities must change

Our priests and lay leaders have been guilty of horrible crimes, and our institution has tended to protect the powerful at the expense of their victims. Although my denomination has different structures of authority in place that have helped to mitigate against the scale of abuse other denominations have seen, this is not a moment for any faith community to claim moral high ground. – The Dean of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Portland, Nathan LeRud

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CoE priest accuses the church of continued cover up

The Rt Revd Peter Ball (83) was recently convicted of sexually abusing 18 teenaged boys & young men during his career in the CoE. He has been sentenced to 32 months imprisonment in OCT 2015. The Revd Graham Sawyer, the current vicar of St James, Briercliffe in Burnley, was one of the 18 victims of Peter Ball. He has recently taken the decision to withdraw from participation in the CoE inquiry of Bishop Ball.

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Church of England responds to abuse case review

Against the background of a government inquiry into dozens of instances of child sexual abuse by those in authority, the Church of England has released the report of an independent review of one case that was settled in the courts last year, but which continues to raise hard questions about the response of senior clerics to reports of abuse.

From the Church of England website:

A review of the case of Rev A was commissioned in September 2015. This followed the disclosure of alleged […]

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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