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Tag: beloved

Breathe

“One deep breath after another. In and out. Reminding myself that I am enough. Trusting that I am loved.”

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The reconciling power of believing you are loved

Even if we intellectually know that violence creates more violence, even if we worry that violence is destroying much that is good in our world, our bodies feel the satisfaction on a deep level as we see violence, once again, save the day.

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Speaking to the Soul: Sit and Eat

As we prepare to enter the holy season of Lent, growing awareness of our own sinfulness can begin to weigh heavy on our hearts and souls. The poem Love (III) by George Herbert offers a helpful reminder that God meets us where we are- messy and broken- and welcomes us with an invitation.

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Speaking to the Soul: In Love with Jesus

The Gospel authors had met Jesus only in verbal accounts, only through others who knew people who had known him. And yet, like a buried priceless treasure, they found him, recognized him as their beloved, acknowledged him as the one for whom their souls had always yearned.

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Holy goodbyes

Complex theology is priestly job-security. But I think the whole Jesus thing is as simple as a kiss on our neck, just behind our ear. Spirituality is that simple. Moisture, and a kiss from a savior who has been released from his tomb while we are released from ours.

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Speaking to the Soul: Named and Claimed

Do not fear, for I have redeemed you;

I have called you by name, you are mine.

Isaiah 43:1

 

The wise men have been and gone; now the readings lead into the baptism of Jesus and the start of his time as an earthly teacher to those that follow him.

Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove. […]

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The Episcopal Café seeks to be an independent voice, reporting and reflecting on the Episcopal Church and the Anglican tradition.  The Café is not a platform of advocacy, but it does aim to tell the story of the church from the perspective of Progressive Christianity.  Our collective sympathy, as the Café, lies with the project of widening the circle of inclusion within the church and empowering all the baptized for the role to which they have been called as followers of Christ.

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