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Tag: Anglican Covenant

Smoke-filled rooms at Lambeth Palace

What we have here, ladies and gentlemen, is the early stages of an unseemly attempt at political hardball from the smoke-filled backrooms of Church House, Lambeth Palace and the Anglican Communion Office. This data is going to be used to justify some sort of General Synod resolution to affirm the Anglican Covenant despite the defeat in the diocesan synods.

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Covenant resolutions: compared

It is time for The Episcopal Church not only to act on its beliefs, but also to stop behaving as though, in our heart of hearts, we feel guilty for doing so. We should be acting boldly for Christ and not be ashamed of the gospel as we understand it.

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A Scottish view of the Covenant

Kelvin Holdsworth, Provost of St, Mary’s Cathedral in Glasgow, says it is important for the American Episcopal Church to formally say “no” to the all of Anglican Covenant not just the last section.

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Wales puts the Covenant on hold.

The Governing Body of the Church in Wales has put the Anglican Covenant on hold, asking for clarity from the Anglican Consultative Council about the documents future in light of rejection by the Church of England.

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The cult of “busyness”

Why did the bishops of the Church of England differ so strikingly from their clergy in their voting about the Anglican Covenant? Sam Norton, an English priest argues that it’s because the Church of England’s “stupid and ungodly culture” honors being busy more than it honors the work of the discernment of God’s will.

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Manchester says “no” to Covenant

Manchester, the last Church of England diocese to vote until after Easter, has voted “no” to the Anglican Covenant. That brings the present vote total, including London’s “no” vote this week, to 25 dioceses against and 15 in favor.

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