Sunday Social Hour

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We are still taking submissions for copy for a Facebook ad for the Cafe. Stop by the post here and weigh in with your 135 word blurb to entice the masses to join our page! (Helpful note: I was inspired to do this by the UCC ad we mentioned in last week’s social hour post.)


The question of whether search committees should Google or not generated some interesting comments both on Facebook and on the original post itself. Jonathan Grieser, posting here, mentioned a couple of things that probably should be added to a “best practices for online existence” list for clergy. By googling himself, so to speak, he’s able to see what’s out there. And any time you comment on a blog, expect it to be read.

Another commenter, this time from Facebook, pointed out:

I have seen what I consider very important information not included in the resume’ or written materials that was very important to a recent search. If it weren’t for the internet, the average person wouldn’t have known that this person’s actions didn’t match his statements. Not using the internet search capabilities would be the same as asking someone to not use a cookbook the first time they try to cook a type of cuisine they haven’t yet tried!

Ann’s question on Tuesday about the USA Today article on churches and social media surprisingly got no takers, so I’ll post it here again. “Is social media making it hard to find privacy and silence? How do you make time to be alone with God?” After all, you can’t friend God on Facebook, but there seem to be a lot of options for following God on Twitter…

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John B. Chilton
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John B. Chilton

Griesner's point about consistency between how the applicant portrays him or herself, and what you can learn from other sources is a good one.

You do need to be careful about google. It can't give you a read on everything. Suppose it helps measure the quality of the sermons, as written and as delivered. The reward is now to put more effort into sermons. Clergy would be foolish not to respond to those rewards, but it's safe to assume some will respond in a way that does real damage to their work that's at least as important. The search committee has be aware of this tendency and redouble its effort to discern how well the clergy person performs those duties that are less easily measured, especially from afar.

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