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Statement by the President: How to Honor Trayvon Martin

Statement by the President: How to Honor Trayvon Martin

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release July 14, 2013

Statement by the President

The death of Trayvon Martin was a tragedy. Not just for his family, or for any one community, but for America. I know this case has elicited strong passions. And in the wake of the verdict, I know those passions may be running even higher. But we are a nation of laws, and a jury has spoken.


I now ask every American to respect the call for calm reflection from two parents who lost their young son. And as we do, we should ask ourselves if we’re doing all we can to widen the circle of compassion and understanding in our own communities. We should ask ourselves if we’re doing all we can to stem the tide of gun violence that claims too many lives across this country on a daily basis. We should ask ourselves, as individuals and as a society, how we can prevent future tragedies like this. As citizens, that’s a job for all of us. That’s the way to honor Trayvon Martin.

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Jeffrey Cox

I told friends that President Obama is the one man who can start a real conversation on Race in America. I thought he can do this during his second term. Outside of a few reactions, he has been relatively mute on this subject.

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John B. Chilton

Jeffrey,

You appear to agree with the president: "we should ask ourselves if we’re doing all we can to widen the circle of compassion and understanding in our own communities. .... We should ask ourselves, as individuals and as a society, how we can prevent future tragedies like this."

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Jeffrey Cox

I am not sure why this is posted in this church forum. Any rate, I am really sad about this entire incident. I also know that Mr. Zimmerman was tried by a jury of his peers and acquitted.

Side note: I find that churches will spend a lot of energy on "national issues" and very little on affecting the mission right outside their neighborhood. We are trying to start a robust Brazilian ministry in my neighborhood but have to wait for endless grant delays from the local diocese. Over 43 percent of the children in my local schools are on free and reduced lunch. What can we do about that? Let's face it: It is easier to act as a jury in a trial states away and harder to work for justice locally.

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