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Standing Committee reports as ACC-16 opens in Lusaka

Standing Committee reports as ACC-16 opens in Lusaka

As the Anglican Consultative Council meeting opens in Lusaka, the Standing Committee issued a report on its meeting held April 6-7. It affirmed the intention expressed at the January gathering of Primates in London to “walk together,” and regretted the absence of some provinces from ACC16, and the “loss of their views from our discussions.”

Members of the Standing Committee will act as table facilitators during the programming of ACC16, which will focus around “intentional discipleship in a world of differences.”

The report affirmed the ACC’s own authority within and relationship with the instruments of the Anglican Communion.

The Standing Committee considered the Communiqué from the Primates and affirmed the relational links between the Instruments of Communion in which each Instrument, including the Anglican Consultative Council, forms its own views and has its own responsibilities.

The full text of the Standing Committee report from ACNS follows.

The Standing Committee met in worship and prayer on 6-7 April at Holy Cross Cathedral in Lusaka, Zambia to effect its regular business and also prepare for the 16th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council to follow. The Standing Committee expresses its thanks to the Province of Central Africa for its generous hospitality and welcomes the opportunity of hearing African voices on issues facing the world and the Church.

The meeting opened with a review of the roles and responsibilities of the Standing Committee, which was particularly useful for the primates on the Standing Committee all of whom were newly elected at the last meeting of the Primates. Secretary General Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon followed with a review of his first ten months in office emphasizing insights he has gained into Anglican ecclesiology through his extensive travels around the Communion. The Secretary General’s report was followed by a discussion of the networks of the Anglican Communion noting those that are currently still active and those that seem to have lapsed.

The Standing Committee received a report from the Archbishop of Canterbury on the Primates’ gathering in January 2016 and noted the stated commitment of the Primates to ‘walk together’ despite differences of view. The Standing Committee welcomed the formation of a Task Group as recommended by the Primates to maintain conversation among them with the intention of restoration of relationship, the rebuilding of mutual trust, and healing the legacy of hurt. The Standing Committee considered the Communiqué from the Primates and affirmed the relational links between the Instruments of Communion in which each Instrument, including the Anglican Consultative Council, forms its own views and has its own responsibilities.

The Standing Committee spent substantial time reviewing the programme and processes for ACC16 including a brief on its communications strategy. The roles and responsibilities of Standing Committee in the ACC meeting were clarified with specific attention to our work as table facilitators. We noted with regret that some provinces will not be attending ACC16 and that this will result in the loss of their views from our discussions. We hold in our prayers all members of the ACC who will not be with us in Lusaka. The Standing Committee urges all members of the ACC to engage openly and respectfully with each other as we explore the theme of ‘intentional discipleship in a world of differences.’

In additional business, the Standing Committee: noted the accounts and approved new trustees for the Anglican Alliance; discussed processes related to the development of possible new Anglican provinces in Sudan, Chile, and Peru; considered the situation of the Church of Ceylon; reviewed the Reports and Financial Statements of the Anglican Consultative Council and of the Lambeth Conference Company; and adopted objectives for the management of the Anglican Communion Office Archives. The Chair, The Rt Revd Dr James Tengatenga, the Vice Chair, Canon Elizabeth Paver, and the following five members of the Standing Committee elected by the ACC were thanked as they complete their terms: Mrs Helen Biggin, Professor Joanildo Burity, The Rt Revd Dr Ian Douglas, The Rt Revd Dr Sarah Macneil and Mr Samuel Mukunya.


Members of the Standing Committee:

President: The Most Revd and Rt Hon Justin Welby

Chair: The Rt Revd Dr James Tengatenga

Vice Chair: Canon Elizabeth Paver

Elected by the Primates’ Meeting:
The Most Revd Dr Philip Freier
The Most Revd Dr Richard Clarke
The Most Revd Dr Mouneer Hanna Anis [not present at this meeting] The Most Revd Dr Thabo Makgoba [not present at this meeting] The Most Revd & Rt Hon Dr John Holder

Elected by the ACC:
Mrs Helen Biggin
The Rt Revd Eraste Bigirimana
Professor Joanildo Burity
The Rt Revd Dr Ian Douglas
The Rt Revd Dr Sarah Macneil
Ms Louisa Mojela
Mr Samuel Mukunya [resigned]

Secretary General: The Most Revd Josiah Idowu-Fearo

Pictured: The 16th Meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council opens today. Via ACNS.

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Stanton Kidd

Was Archbishop Makgoba simply not at this opening meeting or is he also not attending the ACC? Was there an official release from him about this?

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Stanton Kidd

Thank you! For some reason I couldn't find this before. I was going to be really shocked if he wasn't attending at all.

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