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Speaking to the Soul: The party at Cana

Speaking to the Soul: The party at Cana

by Linda Ryan

 

John 2:1-11

People love parties. It’s a  chance to get people together, have a good time, dance, play games, and enjoy good food and good drinks. It’s usually somewhat hectic for the host and hostess, who have to make sure that everything is just right. The house has to be perfectly clean, there has to be enough food, there has to be just the right ambience with music and table settings and what have you, and there’s a need to make sure there’s enough to drink. Now whether the host is serving eggnog or punch or mixed drinks or even wine, they have got to figure how many people they will have, how much each one is going to drink, and then figure how many servings that can be gotten out of a bottle so that the host knows how many bottles of wine to buy. It’s hair-raising, but it’s part of being a party giver.

Today’s story is a familiar one about the wedding at Cana. Jesus and his mother were present at this party, which, in those days, often lasted more than just one day. The party was rolling along merrily when Mary comes to Jesus and tells him they’re almost out of wine. This must’ve been a family event, because why else would Mary be telling this to Jesus? If they were just guests and not family, would have been so common for her to go and say, “By the way, we are out of wine.”. They had already gone through a number of 20 or 30 gallon water jars of wine, and now they were looking for more. Why was it Mary’s and Jesus’ problem? I’m not sure I have an answer to that, but I have a feeling it was a family affair.

Mary approached Jesus about the wine problem. Did she already know he was a miracle worker? Did she think he was going to run down to the nearest shop and have them toddle up with more vats of wine? And who was going to pay for it? Jesus told her that it was his time to be doing stuff like this, but Mary took no notice. Like a typical mother who thinks her kid can walk on water, she turned to the servants and said, “Do whatever he tells you.” And of course we know the result. Suddenly a much better grade of wine filled those existing water jars and everybody was amazed. It isn’t normal to the best stuff until everybody’s already probably past the point of being able to make distinctions as to the quality of the wine there drinking.

The important thing was that Jesus changed the water to wine, not the quantity or quality of the wine that Jesus miraculously made. Jesus would be any hostess’  star guest. Run out of wine? Ask Jesus. Out of food? Jesus could probably do something about that. After all, he did take two loaves and five fish and fed 5000 people, and that was just the men, not counting women and children. Anybody that can produce all of that certainly would be welcome at just about anyone’s party.

So what lesson are we supposed to get from this story, and what is supposed to mean in our own lives? I can tell you it’s probably not to expect someone at a party that you are giving to make up any deficits that may occur. Maybe it’s that no matter how well you plan, there’s always the unexpected, something like running out of an important ingredient. Maybe the lesson is found in the words of Mary when she told the servants to do what Jesus told them to do. Jesus had already tried the “Oh, Ma!” but Mary, like a good mother, paid no attention. She had confidence her boy could solve the problem. “Do whatever he tells you.”

We’ve come a long way from “do what he tells you.” It’s hard now to see such a confidence and also such obedience. After all, Jesus may have been God’s son, but he was also Mary’s, and when mama says to do something, it’s probably best to just do it, whether you like it or not.

“Do whatever he tells you.” Jesus told us a lot of things that we should be doing, like a loving our neighbors, doing good to those that may seem like the rottenest people on earth, caring for the sick, the elderly, the disabled, the prisoners, and most of all, loving God enough to do what God wanted you to do. It seems like lately we’ve forgotten a lot about that. It’s become more of a case of “Do unto others before they do unto you.” I don’t think that’s what Jesus had in mind.

If  I were approached at a party and told that they were almost out of wine, or maybe tiny beef cocktail sausages, or some other comestibles, I would probably go down to the store and pick up a reasonable amount of whatever it was and then bring it back to the party. Don’t ask me to produce it out of thin air, or clear water. I’m not Jesus. Maybe my job is to be Mary, who reminds people to do what he tells you. Maybe that’s the job I need to consider. It doesn’t preclude me doing something myself, but it does mean that I have a mandate to remind people that Jesus gave us a lot of lessons and a lot of ways to be God’s people. One of them is to do what Jesus told us to do. 

Nobody said is going to be easy, and it usually isn’t. It’s not just being a guest at a party, but sometimes being a servant, or someone who makes sure everybody is served and cared for — like any good host/hostess. Like Mary — and Jesus.

 


 

Linda Ryan co-mentors 2 EfM Online groups and keeps the blog Jericho’s Daughter.  She lives in the Diocese of Arizona and is proud to be part of the Church of the Nativity in North Scottsdale.

 

Image: Wikimedia Wedding at Cana

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