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South Sudan Anglicans killed

South Sudan Anglicans killed

South Sudan Bishop Moses Anur Ayom spoke to Religion Unplugged about the recent murder of Anglicans:

At least 23 people were killed this week and 20 others were wounded after unidentified gunmen stormed an Anglican church compound in South Sudan’s Anglican Diocese of Athooch, in Jonglei State. The assailants took six children as hostages….

The gunmen attacked Makol Chuei village from two directions, killing the cathedral’s deacon and at least 14 women and children who had sought refuge in the church compound by vandalising the church, destroying their worship instruments and then setting the area ablaze along with the entire village.

“After killing people in the church, the gunmen went to the homestead village and killed people there,” Bishop Ayom said. “The gunmen burned down the whole village in Makol Chuei.

Another attack in Jalle village killed an Anglican archdeacon, Jacob Amanjok, along with three pastors.

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Sally L Herring

This is so tragic. I know it's very recent but I haven't heard anything about this on NPR or the national news today. This should be highly publicised. Not only should our nation respond but I hope that the Episcopal Church will as well. It breaks my heart to think of the lives that were so violently destroyed and the children who were taken.

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