Somewhat against our better judgment: a Chick-fil-A story

by

Richard Allen Greene of CNN reports:

Billy Graham, the dean of American evangelists, has once again broken his usual silence on hot-button issues, defending the president of the Chick-fil-A restaurant chain for his opposition to same-sex marriage days after issuing a letter decrying what he sees as the nation’s moral decay. …

On Thursday, he issued a statement of support for the popular fast-food chain. Many people have slammed Chick-fil-A President Don Cathy for saying his company backs the traditional family unit and is opposed to same-sex marriage.

Graham praised restaurant founder S. Truett Cathy and son Don Cathy, the company’s president, “for their strong stand for the Christian faith.”

And:

His open letter also contains a fund-raising appeal and a notice that Graham’s son Franklin, himself a major evangelical figure, is launching a new effort to “bring the Gospel into neighborhoods and homes in every corner of America next year.”

Randall Balmer, the chair of the religion department at Dartmouth College, suspects the motivation for the letter is at least partly political.

“It’s hard for me to believe that this letter does not have political intent,” he said.

Its move to decry what he would see as moral decay “would be tied to the Obama administration,” he argued, asking rhetorically why Graham would not have issued the statement in response to an event like the Abu Ghraib torture scandal.

Who can helps us parse the Chick-fil-A situation? If I had ever eaten there, I’d stop eating there. But I don’t know that I’d feel the need to try to drive them out of business. Although I understand the desire to make sure people knew the politics of the place. So rather than my saying five or six more equivocal things, maybe someone else would like to chime in with a strong opinion.

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Priscilla Cardinale
Guest
Priscilla Cardinale

After reading this article from Forbes magazine (2007) I am not the least bit conflicted. I like Chik-Fil-A sandwiches and have eaten them many times in the past.

But I cannot, in good conscience, patronize a business that actively discriminates against employees who don't prescribe to their peculiar religious beliefs.

I would not patronize a business that discriminated against employees based upon my own religious beliefs either. Discrimination is wrong. Period.

Having said that, I disagree with the politicians who are grandstanding on this issue and feel that they are just using the country's newfound distaste for anti-LBBTQ discrimination as a political boost.

Like it or not, when you eat at Chik-Fil-A nowadays, you are making a political and social statement of agreement with the CEO and his religious beliefs. That was his doing.

I see nothing wrong with letting everyone know just what he said and what he practices in his company since he started this and I think that he and his company are perfectly happy to keep away customers whose religious and social beliefs differ. That's a novel marketing idea and certainly creates a very limited customer niche, doesn't it?

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Tom Sramek Jr
Guest

I'm kind of with Rachel Held Evans on this one:

http://rachelheldevans.com/chick-fil-a

I'm perfectly fine with people not patronizing Chick-Fil-A because of the groups and causes that they fund. Everyone has a right to spend their (God's?) money as they see fit. However, when the mayors of Boston and San Francisco start erecting rhetorical fences around their cities which bar Chick-Fil-A from locating there, I think we've gone too far. As Rachel Held Evans points out, what is to prevent the mayor of a more conservative town from barring a mosque or even a JCPenny or Target store because of their support of LGBT rights?

I think when we enlist government in the culture wars firefight, more often then not we get burned.

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A Facebook User
Guest
A Facebook User

Could it be that Billy Graham simply wants to stir up some attention and money for his son's next gigantic evangelism effort/business. There is obviously big money to be had pushing hot buttons. Billy has proven himself an opportunist in the past... Who cares what damage it might do to others; it's for the Gospel, don't you know.

Tom Downs

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minaj
Guest
minaj

I thought that this was a good response:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/conor-gaughan/chick-fil-a-homophobia_b_1711566.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000009&utm_hp_ref=fb&src=sp&comm_ref=false#sb=881769,b=facebook

minaj -- please sign your name next time you comment - thanks ~ed.

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Adam Wood
Guest

I'm conflicted about the whole thing.

As a liberal and a Christian, I am strongly in support of gay marriage.

On the other hand, as an American, I'm strongly in support of fried chicken.

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