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Seven “leadership paradigms” for church growth

Seven “leadership paradigms” for church growth

On the one hand, one begins to wonder if the many factors that contribute to church growth can be captured in list form. On the other hand, folks seem to enjoy reading and discussing them, so one assumes they make some sort of contribution. Having engaged in sufficient equivocation, we present a new list, this one from Ron Edmondson on the seven paradigms necessary for church growth.


An excerpt:

Never waste energy – When something is working, put fuel into it. All cylinders go. That makes sense, right? Momentum feeds momentum. Yes, in keeping the previous one that means you’ll have to ignore a few things to do the very best things. But, usually the most energy will be in a few key places at a time. Never fail to capitalize on those important moments in time.

Embrace change – You have to live in the tension of change if you want to experience growth. Change is never popular with everyone, but when you resist it, you are resisting the opportunity to grow. More of the same may be comfortable, but it seldom produces the excitement necessary for growth.

Make hard decisions – Don’t be naive. Growth brings change. Change brings momentum. And as exciting as that can be not everyone will be excited about it. If you are going to achieve the vision you’ll have to be willing to stand the test of time. That won’t be easy. With some decisions you make you’ll be choosing who buys into the vision and who doesn’t. Be willing to make the hard decisions and you’ll keep the church open to idea of growth.

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