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Roundup: Condolences on the Passing of Prince Philip

Roundup: Condolences on the Passing of Prince Philip

A number of Anglican and Roman Catholic prelates have been among those offering condolences to the Royal Family on the death of Prince Philip earlier today.

From the Archbishop of Canterbury:

“He consistently put the interests of others ahead of his own and, in so doing, provided an outstanding example of Christian service. During his naval career, in which he served with distinction in the Second World War, he won the respect of his peers as an outstanding officer.

“On the occasions when I met him, I was always struck by his obvious joy at life, his enquiring mind and his ability to communicate to people from every background and walk of life. He was a master at putting people at their ease and making them feel special.

“The legacy he leaves is enormous. The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, which he founded in 1956, has inspired generations of young people to help others and instilled in them a vision for citizenship and a desire to serve their communities. His work with countless charities and organisations reflected his wide- ranging, global interests in topics including wildlife, sport, design, engineering and inter-faith dialogue.

From Cardinal Vincent Nichols:

At this moment of sadness and loss I pray for the repose of the soul of Prince Philip, Her Majesty the Queen’s faithful and loyal husband. I pray for the Queen and all of the Royal Family.

“How much we will miss Prince Philip’s presence and character, so full of life and vigour. He has been an example of steadfast loyalty and duty cheerfully given. May he rest in peace.”

From Eamon Martin, the Catholic Archbishop of Armagh:

Prince Philip has been a regular visitor to Northern Ireland in connection with his widespread charitable work.  Many pupils from right across the community here have participated in the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme. However, his visit to Ireland along with Queen Elizabeth in 2011, stands out as a cherished moment of peace and reconciliation and as an historic demonstration of the importance of mutual understanding and respectful relationships between these islands.

The Church Times also has an obituary which describes Prince Philip’s commitments to his faith, as well as statements from several Church of England bishops and other faith groups in England.

Many have expressed respect for the way in which the Prince is acknowledged to have knuckled down to a role as the Queen’s consort which was distinctly unwelcome at the stage in life at which it came, and which cost him the naval career that he loved. There is respect and admiration for his rising above a childhood scarred by turbulence and family tragedies and spent largely in exile; and for his overcoming the hostility and suspicion of courtiers to a “foreign prince”.

…With the Dean of Windsor, Robin Woods, later to become Bishop of Worcester, he explored theology and the impact of faith on the world and was keenly interested in the relationship between scientists and theologians. Letters between the Prince and Michael Mann, later Dean of Windsor, on the concept of evolution, were published in 1984 as A Windsor Correspondence.

Multiple major news outlets have reported that the Prince is expected to “lie in rest” in St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle. Precise funeral plans are still pending, and are expected to be somewhat scaled back from prior, long-planned arrangements due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

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