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Rosa Parks remembered at National Cathedral

Rosa Parks remembered at National Cathedral

The National Cathedral in Washington DC dedicated a stone carving of Rosa Parks yesterday according to USAToday:

From the program book for this evening’ event:

Rosa Louise Parks, nationally recognized as the mother of the modernday civil rights movement in america, was born in tuskegee, alabama,on February 4, 1913. her refusal in 1955 to surrender her seat to a whitemale passenger on a Montgomery, alabama, bus triggered a wave ofprotest that reverberated throughout the United state

Rosa Louise Parks, nationally recognized as the mother of the modern day civil rights movement in America, was born in Tuskegee, Alabama, on February 4, 1913. Her refusal in 1955 to surrender her seat to a white male passenger on a Montgomery, Alabama, bus triggered a wave of protest that reverberated throughout the United States.

The sculpture of Parks will sit in the Cathedral’s Human Rights Porch alongside a carving of Mother Teresa. Both carvings were designed by Chas Fagan, an artist from North Carolina, and carved in the spring of 2011 by cathedral stone carver Sean Callahan.

Photos of the project are here.

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